Kitchen earth bonding

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by Eric Idle, Nov 10, 2017.

  1. Eric Idle

    Eric Idle New Member

    hi, bit of advice needed.
    I am replacing the kitchen tap and the earth is connected to the copper pipe tails below the taps.
    The new tap has flexi hoses so the earth needs to be removed and relocated.
    Do I need to turn the power off when I remove the earth, or is it ok to go ahead with the power on?
    Many thanks.
     
  2. retiredsparks

    retiredsparks Well-Known Member

    Rather than get too technical.....
    is it one clamp or 2 interconnected ?
    just replace them on solid clean pipe.
    It might be that you need to use 2 new clamps 65778
    ae235.jpeg RS
     
  3. Eric Idle

    Eric Idle New Member

    Hello,
    There are two clamps interconnected, both look to be in very good condition.
     
  4. JP.

    JP. Screwfix Select

    As per RS - however the only clamps I use are the pictured type - its an EC16 clamp style

    1205322614.jpg

    I would only use new ones as the old ones tend to get all scrunged up and stuff when removing
     
  5. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Active Member

    As others have said, just move the clamps along the pipe, but clean the pipe first. No need to take them off if you can loosen them and slide them along to the bit you have cleaned, and re tighten. Don't forget the bonding to the steel sink bowl and drainer. I would not normally turn off the supply, but if their is a fault or PME conditions exist, a voltage could be present between the clamps and pipes.
     
  6. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    I’d be inclined to throw them away.
    I most certainly wouldn’t be replacing with new.
     
  7. JP.

    JP. Screwfix Select

    Is it a requisite to do the above in all cases Bob? For example on a rewire under the 17th?
     
  8. retiredsparks

    retiredsparks Well-Known Member

    As we are not aware of the electrical system, supply type, MEB, RCD protection...it may be prudent to just move them a few inches and leave in situ ?
    Rs
     
  9. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    It’s a kitchen.
    Unless the pipework is extraneous, there’s no need for bonding, irrespective of the supply and protective measures.
    Move the clamps by all means, but purchase and install new clamps?
     
  10. retiredsparks

    retiredsparks Well-Known Member

    " unless"....very big word...similar to "if"...
     
  11. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    As in if one of the pipes is the incoming feed and is metallic.
    In which case the conductor will have to be taken from that pipe back to the CU.
     
  12. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Active Member

    Their are many factors to consider when deciding the scope and extent of the bonding regime in an installation. We know little of this installation other than the electrician who did it considered it necessary to provide bonding at this point. The electrician had information we do not, it is therefore prudent to advise re instatement of the bonding making it as close as possible to the original installation. As for a re wire under the 17th, the words and the numbers may have changed, but the electrical science underpinning the regulations remains the same as it has been for years. Basically, that is, If a situation arises where conductive parts, some of which that may become live, are placed in such a way that contact may be made with both simultaneously, the those parts should either be separated by continuous barriers of insulating material, or electrically bonded so as to prevent a potential difference existing between them in the event of a fault. "Rules are for fools and for the guidance of wise men", we are all Professional Electricians, we should be at the "Wise men" end of this spectrum with the electrical science knowledge to enable us to interpret the regulations in a way that best suits the installation while providing safety against shock and fire. This is one of our abilities that makes us different from the DIY electrician.
     
    retiredsparks likes this.
  13. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    Why is it people have to interpret the Regs rather than just comply with them?
    Another question.
    If I have a washing machine connected to an RFC with a 1.5mm2 CPC which has a resistance of 0.75 Ohms next to a stainless steel sink which is bonded with a 10mm2 conductor which has a resistance of 0.05 Ohms.
    How much Current would pass through me to the sink if the washing machine developed a 30A Earth fault and I were touching both at the same time (perhaps unloading wet clothes from the machine onto the draining board)?
     
  14. JP.

    JP. Screwfix Select

    Many thanks for your in depth reply Bob - all interesting stuff m8
     

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