Lost water pressure upstairs

Discussion in 'Plumbers' Talk' started by Boysilver, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. Boysilver

    Boysilver New Member

    Had a small leak under the kitchen sink, which appeared to be coming from an old water filter (dual tank thing). He removed the filter so the mains water simply comes in and out the house and no more leak.
    However, since then we’ve lost massive water pressure upstairs (sink, bath, etc).
    Any ideas why this might be?
     
  2. Dam0n

    Dam0n Active Member

    just upstairs? do you have a cw storage tank in the loft?
     
  3. Boysilver

    Boysilver New Member

    Flat roof house, so a combi boiler upstairs and the issue is only upstairs too.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
  4. terrymac

    terrymac Well-Known Member

    Who removed the " filter " ? If a plumber get them back. If yourself , were any isolating valves closed and not fully opened ? Red handled gate valves are notorious for failing ,any involved ?
     
  5. Boysilver

    Boysilver New Member

    A plumber did it (I use the word loosely - a retired local bloke). No valves involved as far as I’m aware. He simply removed the under sink filter and redirected the incoming cold water hose to the outgoing pipe. During the process the mains water tap was switched off as was the boiler. All back on now though.
     
  6. terrymac

    terrymac Well-Known Member

    Sounds like he has done more than you think . there are not many scenarios where mains pressure water will drop dramatically to upstairs ,whilst downstairs is fine. One is valve not fully open ,second is physical restriction , I.e blockage in pipe work. Can you post pics of the connections made ?
     
  7. CGN

    CGN Well-Known Member

    Prob the stop cock.
     
  8. terrymac

    terrymac Well-Known Member

    I assume the kitchen cold tap is downstairs and is giving good pressure ?
     
  9. Boysilver

    Boysilver New Member

    This is what I’ve been left with where the filter was.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Boysilver

    Boysilver New Member

    Pressure is excellent everywhere downstairs.
     
  11. terrymac

    terrymac Well-Known Member

    Looks like that hose is your problem. It appears to have tight bends ,which will restrict the flow dramatically. Those hoses have an inner rubber tube and the internal bore is rather less than a copper pipe ,so that alone reduces flow. Once bent sharply it reduces even more. I presume your kitchen tap is connected to the copper pipework BEFORE this hose ?
     
  12. Boysilver

    Boysilver New Member

    As far as I’m aware it is.
     
  13. Dam0n

    Dam0n Active Member

    I'd agree with Terry. Nothing screams bodge more than a pushfit flexi.

    For the time being you should be able to fit a longer flexi in place of that. That'll reduce the kinking and allow the flow to reach upstairs.
     
  14. terrymac

    terrymac Well-Known Member

    Get rid of the hose ,and have it done in copper tube . if you look closely at the hose ,I think you will see it is deformed ,flattened out and no longer circular in section. A bit like if you squash a garden hose pipe ,and with the same result !!
     
  15. Boysilver

    Boysilver New Member

    Thanks for the advice folks. Really appreciated. As a non-plumber, is this something I could do myself easily enough? Anything I need to know before trying to tackle it?
     
  16. Dam0n

    Dam0n Active Member

    If you fit a longer push fix flexi as a temporary measure you will just have to turn off the water, put a bucket underneath, pull off the old fitting and push a new one on.

    That'll restore pressure and you can then think about getting someone in to do the job in copper. Where are you based? I'll happily pop around and do that in copper for you for a cuppa. Only if you're local mind :D
     
    DIY womble likes this.
  17. terrymac

    terrymac Well-Known Member

    Do it once ,and do a proper job. As that pipe is likely supplying the combi boiler ,and therefore all hot water up and downstairs as well as cold upstairs the last thing you want is a flexi hose. Do it in copper tube.
     
  18. Spasimodo

    Spasimodo New Member

    As has been said it's advisable to replace the flexi with copper pipe and if you want to tackle this yourself use compression elbows. You mentioned loss of pressure earlier, it's more likely loss of flow (volume of water passing through) due to a restriction being caused by distortion which in turn is caused either by the tight bends on the flexi or by the flexi being twisted (which will cause a reduction of its cross sectional area ……… a restriction !)
     
  19. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member

    The OP is not a plumber and possibly does not have many tools and maybe lacks expertise/confidence. (Please don't take offence)

    Fitting compression may solve it but surely an easier way would be to use push fit an plastic pipe. A simple straight connector onto the existing copper - each side. 50mm of pipe on each with two 90 degree bends at the top and a short joining pipe. With inserts too - it also allows a little flexibility for inaccurate cutting. Using Hep2O with their latest in4sure inserts makes it reasonably easy for a newcomer to get a decent install.

    With some skill the straight connectors and short pipe could even be left out and just two 90s used - but that will need careful cutting and accuracy.
     
  20. retiredsparks

    retiredsparks Well-Known Member

    No point advising a non tech person to do 'simple' jobs (which in fact are not simple...they just seem to be easy to us.)
    Get the retired bodger back to do it properly taking notes from the advice here.
    Rs
     

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