Lowering 1cm of about 1 m2 of screed

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by Sebas, Apr 15, 2020.

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  1. Sebas

    Sebas New Member

    Hello

    My house has a passageway between it as an the neighbors. It is about 1.2 m wide and over 15 meters long ending in a room in the back of the house. The bottom of the door facing the street is just few milliliters from the floor screed and it cannot be raised. I'm putting self leveling+tiles so I'd need to lower the screed about 12 milliliters. I don't plan to lower all of it as I've already put tiles the the back so I considering lowering just the first metter, Just enough to be able to open the door, and leave a small step (just over 1 cm)

    Any advice about how to lower about 1 meter square of screed ?

    Thanks
     
  2. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    What type of door is it, timber or uPVC?
     
  3. Sebas

    Sebas New Member

    IMG_20200415_173958920.jpg IMG_20200415_173932614.jpg
    it is uPVC and its hinges have been adjusted the maximum that they can be. Whoever fitted that door, didn't fit it right as the gap is bigger when it is open than when it is closed... and the floor is not tilt (the bubble is perfect in the center)
     
  4. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    What’s the gap on the door head like from outside?
     
  5. WillyEckerslike

    WillyEckerslike Screwfix Select

    A 1cm step is a guaranteed trip point. If you possibly can I would try to create a very gentle slope to accommodate the change in level. You can shift a lot of screed quite quickly with a scabbling bit in an SDS hammer then tidy up with a diamond flattening disc in a small grinder. The dust will be horrendous though - or worse than horrendous...
     
    longboat, Sebas and Jord86 like this.
  6. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select


    The floors not level though surely? There’s a decent gap between bottom of the door when closed but bugger all when it’s open? The door can’t be out of plumb that much otherwise it’d be swinging open with a crash all the time.
     
  7. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select


    My first thought this morning was hiring a floor scabbler but I wondered if the door could be bumped up to save all the hassle. Dust will be like Hiroshima.
     
    WillyEckerslike likes this.
  8. Sebas

    Sebas New Member

    Actually you are right .... I've just checked and the door seems perfectly in plumb... The floor is not perfect....
     
    WillyEckerslike likes this.
  9. Sebas

    Sebas New Member

    IMG_20200415_181705287_HDR.jpg
    IMG_20200415_181846343_HDR.jpg
    That may work actually... Does it mean to remove all the screws and fit them back 1 cm above ?
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2020
  10. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    Post a photo of the door looking at it from the outside.
     
  11. Sebas

    Sebas New Member

    Even if having a second look, the gap above the door is very tight....


    IMG_20200415_185155892.jpg IMG_20200415_185025437.jpg
     
  12. Sebas

    Sebas New Member

    Will the dust come just from the grinder or also from the hammer ?
     
  13. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    As I see it, you’ve four choices, three really but there’s always room for a Joker. Or a combination.

    1. Knock the plaster off the lintel above the front door and see how much room there is to play with. Remove the door and frame from the opening, stick it on a bench and remove a quarter inch from the top of the frame by handsaw and a power planer. Refit the frame bumping it up as tight as possible, then see what clearance you’re left with on the lintel and on the floor. Bluegrit the lintel and skim over.
    2. Use a long level across the screed and see if there’s a sharp bump where the door opens onto, or if the whole screed is running gradual towards the front door. If it’s a bump, chisel it out and rescreed it at the lower level, if it’s gradual, onto the next plan.
    3. Hire a floor scabbler to grind the screed down. Mess and dust extraordinaire.
    4. Mark out a metre or so from the front door, chisel the screed out and fit a different tile, oak floor with an inset doormat, leave the screed and fit thin vinyl instead of thick tile to hide the issue and create a feature etc, though this will depend on the style of the house and whether you can make it look good with choice of material rather than naff.
     
    Sebas likes this.

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