Metal garage door, smoothing indents from flaked-off paint?

Discussion in 'Painters' Talk' started by glob@l, Aug 8, 2018 at 12:16 PM.

  1. glob@l

    glob@l New Member

    I'm preparing a garage door prior to painting (gloss white) after wire brushing and scraping, I would like some advice on how to smooth out and/or paint over the edges where the flaked-off paint has gone back to bare metal, leaving an indent.

    The door is from Catnic Limited and according to the label they advise painting with exterior household paint.
     
  2. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    You need to feather it off with fine wet and dry and then prime and undercoat before top coat.
     
  3. glob@l

    glob@l New Member

    Ah! Wet and dry, presumably just using sandpaper alone would be too abrasive to smooth out the edges.
     
  4. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    Yes and use it wet.
     
  5. glob@l

    glob@l New Member

    Will do! Incidentally, are the numbers (chippie244) 3 of 8 by any chance?
     
  6. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    No.
     
    CGN likes this.
  7. glob@l

    glob@l New Member

    This garage door is going to take forever, I've been at it all afternoon and hardly made a dent (excuse the pun) in it. There must be an easier way to prepare it?
     
  8. Wayners

    Wayners Active Member

    Heat gun and get the paint off. Sand. Rust killer. Correct primer then paint. Could use a paint stripper but that costs.
     
  9. Astramax

    Astramax Well-Known Member

    Are you sure it's bare metal, should be a galvanized coating. Work my conkers off prepping and painting 15 garage doors and frames in 4 days regularly.................hate it, but it pays the bills.
     
    CGN likes this.
  10. glob@l

    glob@l New Member

    I presume a heat gun would melt the paint on the metal door in a similar way to the pain on wood, or will it prove to be more difficult
    Astramax, while sanding raised areas of the door the bare metal has been exposed although most areas show the original coating. You didn't say how you prepare your garage doors?
     
  11. Astramax

    Astramax Well-Known Member

    Can you post a photo of the door?
     
  12. glob@l

    glob@l New Member

    So far, the options are wet and dry sanding, heat gun or chemical paint stripper.
    Portable sand/bead blasting? (probably not cost effective)
    Could it be over-painted with a thicker paint/primer/undercoat to disguise the areas where the existing paint has been removed?
     
  13. LEH

    LEH Member

    Sounds like it's getting over-complicated to me. Sand down to a stable surface, prime any exposed metal with Bullseye 123, two coats of Allcoat exterior. That's my plan for mine anyway.
     
  14. glob@l

    glob@l New Member

    I'm presuming your door isn't flaking with no exposed edges between the existing paint and flaked-off area to deal with.
    For your convenience a quick look at the products you advised revealed...

    [​IMG]
    Hi. Thank you for your enquiry.
    All Coat Exterior is suitable to be applied over Bullseye 1-2-3, however, as All Coat Exterior is self priming it is not necessary to apply a separate primer.
    2 coats of All Coat Exterior are recommended, the first acts as the primer/sealer and the second coat completes the sealing process whilst providing additional protection.
    Hope this helps.
    25 Apr 2017
    by
    Zinsser Product Support,
     
  15. LEH

    LEH Member

    There's the odd bit of flaking with some exposed metal.

    I was going off this:

    http://www.zinsseruk.com/howto/paint-galvanised-metal/

    Perhaps I'm misreading though, whether 'bare metal' means without the galvanised coating on it. However, either way it's not going to hurt.
     
  16. glob@l

    glob@l New Member

    Ah right! So you're happy to paint over any exposed metal without feathering it for example?
     
  17. LEH

    LEH Member

    I think if you do the prep carefully, sanding back to sound paint, spot priming the exposed parts and then putting two coats over the top it should all come out fine. If you're really concerned about seeing the edges of the flaked regions through the finish, you can sand, prime, sand, prime etc and then do your top coats. I'm doing a satin finish, which is a little more forgiving of defects than gloss admittedly.

    You can see if Astramax comes back to agree/disagree, I don't have anywhere near as much experience, but I'm satisfied with this plan of action.

    As he said, a photo would be good - if it's a real mess it might be easier to take it back to metal with paint stripper, but if most is sound I don't see the point taking it all off.
     
    Astramax likes this.
  18. glob@l

    glob@l New Member

    Some interesting points made there!
    Sometimes you can make a lot of unnecessary work for yourself when there's a simple solution.
    The door is in good condition. By the sound of it, I may have more exposed areas than you to put right.
     
  19. glob@l

    glob@l New Member

  20. Astramax

    Astramax Well-Known Member

    Doesn't look too bad.:)

    Good advice ;)
     

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