Metricery

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by mailee, Mar 21, 2004.

  1. jorustle

    jorustle Guest

    Hey Dewy! Never mind paying thrupence for a bag of chips. We could only afford a penny bag of scratchings.
     
  2. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds New Member

    skil6513.

    The kilogramme is directly related to the basic unit of length (the metre) as follows.

    The amount (weight) of water held in a cube with sides of 1 metre was a unit they called a tonne, this is too large a quantity to be useful to ordinary people. The amount of water (weight) held in a cube with sides of 1mm was designated a gramme (this is too small a unit to be usefull to ordianry people [they meant peasants]

    SO unusually for the French they got pragmatic they multiplied the gramme by 1000 (the word kilo) and called it a kilogramme (1000 grammes) because it equated to a weight that everybody [peasants included] understood namely 2 pounds. [before metric the French had a weight system that was very similar to ours they used a weight that equated closely to the pound)
     
  3. WOLF

    WOLF New Member

    typical frog, always the easy way out of everything, and D-Deeds, of course metric is inferior.... and less accurate, why, cos the best and most accurate system for any sort of measurement, is the G.P.S ...correct...yes (i hear you say!!) well GPS is calculated by DEGREES, MINUTES and SECONDS....and that sure as hell ain't metric...now is it!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  4. Dewy

    Dewy New Member

    Thats why the nautical mile (knot) is the only real measuring system.
    1000 knots = 1 hour.
    24,000 nautical miles = circumference of the world.
     
  5. Lightning McQueen

    Lightning McQueen New Member

    DEGREES, MINUTES AND SECONDS is a fairly arbitrary system for measuring angles in my opinion. Why are there 360° in a circle? The simple answer is somebody took a circle and decided to divide it into 360 equal segments and call the angle subtended by the radii forming one segment 1°. Why are there not 400° in a circle? It would make the maths easier. A right angle would be 100°. A 45° slope would become a 50° slope. It's all fairly abitrary.

    The purest means of angular measurement is the radian but this doesn't mean much to the man in the street. There are 2 PI radians in a full circle. This isn't really much use in a practical situation and so we have the system of degrees, minutes and seconds. It is no more and no less accurate than either the metric or imperial linear measurements.
     
  6. Dewy

    Dewy New Member

    The reason there are 360° in a circle was that ancient astronomers in the middle east inaccurately measured a year as having 360 days instead of 365.
    If they had got it right then a circle would have been divided into 365° making it a nightmare to use.
     
  7. Lightning McQueen

    Lightning McQueen New Member

    Well, Dewy. I never knew that. I suppose it's the same as the Celsius temperature scale where someone said the temp at which water freezes we will call 0°C and the temp at which it boils we will call 100°C. Its an arbitrary scale.
     
  8. Dewy

    Dewy New Member

    And fahrenheit was set because a king wanted the scale set where freezing was 0°, blood was 100° & boiling was 200°.
    This was impossible so a compromise was used around the world until Centigrade (Celcius) became the standard.
    Fahrenheit has freezing at 32°, blood at 98.6° & boiling at 212°.
     
  9. WOLF

    WOLF New Member

    and just to make matters even worse, some one worked out "PECO" seconds, for measuring time.... well i never!!!!
     
  10. Dewy

    Dewy New Member

    Some tried to introduce a decimal clock where there were 100 minutes to the hour. DECimal means 10 not 100.
    Our works accountant wanted to divide the hour into 10s to make wage calculations easier with a calculator. The wages clerk had great problems working out time & a half of 1/4hour & time & a third for nightshift work.
    The bosses wouldn't allow it so he tried it during the annual holiday when there was just a skeleton staff in.
    He worked the wages out in a fraction of the time & showed the MD on his return. It was a fait accompli.
    Night shift got a rise because instead of time and a third of 40 hours we were paid 1.35 times the rate to make it easier. Wages could be worked out in one day instead of 3 days before leaving the office staff more time for other things.
     
  11. mr spanton

    mr spanton New Member

    At one time I thought inches ounces etc were intrinsically British. I was brought up that way. I started off learning in fractions, then had to change to decimal halfway through school. My Grandmother ran a shop while we changed to decimal and got into bother for refusing to use pounds and 'new pee'. More recently I heard somewhere that "inch" "ounce" and "uncial" ( a lettering type used by monks where the top and bottom guidelines used to obtain uniform letter size, were set to one inch) were related - I forget how, and that the Romans imposed them on us. Does anyone know more about this? I also read somewhere on a website that they used (or some maybe still use) inches (called peauces or peuces) in France. They were different than Imperial (Imperial Rome?) inches, and varied from region to region.

    Mr Spanton
     
  12. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds New Member

    wolf, i will go with degrees minutes and seconds
     
  13. Dewy

    Dewy New Member

    The inch was originally the distance between the 2 knuckles on the index finger.
    try it. it's not far off.
     

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