Mitre saw help?!

Discussion in 'Tool Talk' started by Joe92, Oct 17, 2012.

  1. Joe92

    Joe92 New Member

    Hello I'm new to the forum but thought I'd start with a question.

    I'm looking at buying a sliding mitre saw and I'm stuck between about 4 options. The options are for the larger bladed saws are the Bosch GCM 10SD and the Makita LS1018. I have read somewhere else about blade wobble so I have also added two other saws to the list, these are the Makita LS0714 and the Dewalt 777.

    The issues I have is that if I buy a 10" saw is it likely to produce a bad blade wobble, or is this not such a massive deal?
    and the the issue I have with the smaller saws like the Makita in particular, is 52mm depth just too small for site use? I realise it'd be good for skirting etc but is it likely I'd come across anything thicker in day to day work where I'd regret going for the bigger saw?
    any advice on these models is much appreciated and welcome.
    Also I have a max budget of £450.
    Thanks in advance.
    Joe
     
  2. wiggy

    wiggy Screwfix Select

    I doubt very much you will get any wobble with that size blade or larger, I have the 305mm dewalt which has seen better days, one of my lads had a big ding a few years back and the blade got bent, I put a new blade on and have a slight wobble, but it hasn't effected the quality of cut.
     
  3. G Brown

    G Brown New Member

    Go for the biggest blade set up you can afford from decent brands such as Dewalt, Makita etc. Avoid budget brands and avoid a small blade set up that is going to be very limiting.
     
  4. Joe92

    Joe92 New Member

    Thanks guys.
    So does the Bosch sound like a good bet? I think that both saws have pretty much the same spec but I'm still stuck.
    Either this Makita - *

    Or this Bosch - *

    I'm close to buying now, I didn't really want to buy a small bladed saw, it's just that the "blade wobble" issue kinda deterred me from a larger one, and with the prices of three tools idon't have the money to be fritter it away.
    Thanks.

    Message was edited by: Screwfix Moderator

    Message was edited by: Screwfix Moderator
     
  5. wiggy

    wiggy Screwfix Select

    I reckon it depends on your main sort of work, my dewalt 718 is handy for 80% of my work but sometimes it is just too big and heavy and I could do with a smaller one.
    Have a look at the makita LSO 714, it has a double sliding thing going on and will cut as wide as the 718
     
  6. Joe92

    Joe92 New Member

    It's only single bevel and only has a depth of 52mm though, is it likely I'll need more than 50mm really, or like the other blokes say is bigger really better?
    I do like the look of the LS0714, stuck between that and the larger Bosch though.
    What timber is there that's more than 52mm that would be used in day to day joinery, I mean most studding is less than 2" anyway and I can't really think of any other timber that I'd need more.
    What are the depths of cornice and pelmet usually? I may have a kitchen fitting job coming up soon so I may have to allow for that.
    Ta.
     
  7. Captain Leaky

    Captain Leaky New Member

    52mm is a poor depth of cut, you will soon get fed up. I have a 718 and never ever had a problem with my wobbly bits...
     
  8. wiggy

    wiggy Screwfix Select

    The dw718 is a good bit of kit for sure, but it wont cut all the way through a 4inch post.
    Most of my jobs last a few months, with a lot of 1st fix, which it is ideal for, so i just set it up and leave it on the job.
    But there are times when i wish i had a smaller more portable saw for 2nd fix stuff. Whats your main area of work?
    I worked with a fella who had the lso714 and it impressed me......
     
  9. Joe92

    Joe92 New Member

    Would you recommend the DW777? It's pretty much the Dewalt equivalent of the Makita I think, 62mm depth of cut but 215mm crosscut?
    It's mostly second fix really, I work for somebody at the minute but I'm looking to build up my tool collection more for when the time comes. I do get some weekend jobs, such as this kitchen. So no really heavy duty work, like the aforementioned fence posts.
    If the need did arise I'd consider getting a compound chop saw, my mate has one of these and it takes a bit on site.
     
  10. Joe92

    Joe92 New Member

  11. wiggy

    wiggy Screwfix Select

    That would work,  I used similar at college, bigger isnt always better, even though I do a lot of 1st fix a smaller saw than the 718 would be enough for the majority my work, its only when it comes to cutting 8x2 at angles that it pays off.
    Out of the makita 714 and the dewalt 777 I think I would go with the makita, purely on the fact that I have used it and its smooth and I found the dewalt a bit jumpy from memory, probably best to get to tool shop and have a play, where are you based?
     
  12. wiggy

    wiggy Screwfix Select

    Makita has a better angle range also
     
  13. Joe92

    Joe92 New Member

    I'm based in Derbyshire, I think there's a few tool shops around Derby so I should have a busy weekend.
    That's just what I wanted to hear, somebody with some first hand experience of the tool and can give an honest opinion. Which sort of shops usually have demos?
     
  14. wiggy

    wiggy Screwfix Select

    I doubt you will get a demo anywhere, but if you can just get your hands on one and feel the slide and weight, failing that do what i do, go on colour
     
  15. Joe92

    Joe92 New Member

    Oh right, well, getting hands on is the next best thing anyway probably.
    Seems good logic.
    Also have another model in mind, but the lack of a major brand puts me off a little, then the major fact of it being 240v.
    Do you think the saw'sworth the pun or?
     
  16. Joe92

    Joe92 New Member

    Numpty, I didn't add the link.
    *

    Message was edited by: Screwfix Moderator
     
  17. wiggy

    wiggy Screwfix Select

    8kg heavier, 240v ok if you're never going on site, personally i wouldnt, sure axminster are as good as any....

    110v is a pain with the transformer but 240v limits where you can work
     
  18. Joe92

    Joe92 New Member

    Yeah, I think I'll go with the Makita then, so long as it feels good.
    Is it also possible to use the same blade from my Makita rip saw to the Makita Mitre saw? They're both 190mm? Tried looking elsewhere for the info but no luck.  
     
  19. goldenboy

    goldenboy Super Member

  20. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    hello
    just thought that i would chuck in my 2ps worth, good advice from wiggy there, what ever you do don't get the 777 i have used this thing since it was an elu model, i hated it then and i do now, and the 718 was a really bad attempt at making the previous elu model better and in true dewalt style , made it worse, (old 708 rocks though) anyways if i were to by another it would be the new makita that has a massive cross cut capacity and does not weigh as much as a cow! by the way i have noticed that for some reason the makita blades are very, very good not sure what they do different but, they are fab!
     

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