Moving door and new liner help

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by Scott61985, Jun 6, 2018.

  1. Scott61985

    Scott61985 Member

    Hi everybody need a bit of help I've moved a door further down the wall so our new sofa fits in the room better and gives more space. I've boarded the old door up. I got the biggest door liner I could get after telling the shop what wall it was going into. Breeze block by the way. It's all nice and flush in the hallway side but in the room the plasterboard sits over the liner it's old dot and dabbed. I was hoping to get it skimed and all door frames on but with this now I've no idea. I know il get shot down for this mistake.
     

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  2. DIY womble

    DIY womble Active Member

    You can either use suitable sized wood to add to the frame or dot and dab level to existing plaster work and plasterer will bead ,skim but you won't have architrave
     
  3. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    No lintel put in ?
     
  4. DIY womble

    DIY womble Active Member

    Good point , could at least have put a central post also to stiffen up the plasterboard
     
  5. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    For the lining you need some 7x1 1/4" or whatever size is just wider than blocks and dot and dab.
    This can then be planed to the actual width required and fitted in place.
     
  6. Jitender

    Jitender Well-Known Member

    I've had this on one door lining I fitted last year, the wall was quite far out plum.

    What I did was use the smaller lining, (was measured right, but level of wall not taken into consideration) fix and align the door lining so it is flush or just past plaster level. It should clear the architraves this was the hinge side. Then on the opposite side glued and nail some strip wood to correct thickness to match plaster line. This avoids having to modify both sides of the frame.

    You can still do this, but the door needs to be dehung and strip wood adding, then hinges will need recessing again, maybe best to do this after boarding so you chose the correct thickness of wood.

    For linings not available of the shelf I usually get these machined from the timber merchants although there is a 2 week wait.
     
  7. Jitender

    Jitender Well-Known Member

    Agree with the lintel, need to get right size, more work but worth it, as I notice the boxing in. Other than this, door look fitted well :)
     
  8. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    All you need to do is buy 1 1/4" par at whatever width required and trim to size.
    No need to wait two weeks and pay machining for something that can be bought off the shelf.
     
  9. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    Could be the OP lives in a bungalow. ;)
     
  10. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    Does not matter,if that is the case there should still be a concrete lintel or a low profile indoor 1" deep catnic.
     
  11. Scott61985

    Scott61985 Member

    Stupid as it sounds Iam going to put one In i know it's backwards way round. Don't think there's much chance of getting that liner out easy with the foam and the fixings with out making some damage.
     
  12. Scott61985

    Scott61985 Member

    Cheers I've fitted a few doors before and changed liners this is first time it's not gone to plan. The boxing in is old and coming out aswell as all the coving.
     
  13. Scott61985

    Scott61985 Member

    So really best option is to rip out and start all again
     
    seen it all before likes this.
  14. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    How can you say that , when you don’t know what’s actually above the doorway ? For all you know , there could be a 1 high run of blockwork above the doorway.
     
  15. Scott61985

    Scott61985 Member

    There is
     

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