New skirting problem

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Phiggins, Apr 20, 2010.

  1. Phiggins

    Phiggins New Member

    Hi all,

    I can assume this has been asked a hundred times previously, but i'm unable to find a specific answer.

    I am putting skirting up in my conservatory using some lengths left over from a previous job which have been stored in my garage.
    The lengths, I have found after cutting, are bowed along the length. Not by nuch, but enough to be noticed on the external mitre joints.

    Is there a method of cutting the external mitres of the skirting that can hide the bowing, or is there a decent wood filler that can be used to fill the gaps (the skirting will be stained a medium oak after).

    Thanks in advance,

    Pete
     
  2. Mr Mike

    Mr Mike New Member

    "Is there a method of cutting the external mitres of the skirting that can hide the bowing,"

    No.

    "is there a decent wood filler that can be used to fill the gaps (the skirting will be stained a medium oak after)."

    Try a search for "stainable wood filler"....there are plenty that come up.

    Moral of the story is, check for bowing before fixing, and if it is bowed then fix it convex, so the middle of the bow can be pulled in with plugs and screws.
     
  3. flyingscotsman

    flyingscotsman New Member

    Have you tried to straighten the wee rascal. :)
     
  4. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    All that time faffin about, you could buy new. Much better and pleasing finish. Coz I bet the walls in the conny are perfectly straight, so you'd be making a bad job of it.

    If the bows are CONVEX(in the centre), it is possible to plane and smooth the centre out, and be not too much noticeable. If concave, not so clever.

    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     
  5. parana

    parana New Member

    or you could discard and buy new....


    P
     
  6. robchippie

    robchippie New Member

    i think you mean the skirting is cupped and not bowed because i cant think why it would matter that much if they were bowed. you could plane the bottom down to get the right line round the room.
     
  7. Mr Mike

    Mr Mike New Member

    I think you're right robchippie, i think original poster is talking about cupping, as is handyandy........I was taking it literally as read and considering it as bowed in its length, whereas you're talking about it being bowed in its width (along its length) !?!?

    Best option, change it for new straight timber.

    ....otherwise fill, sand & stain and let it niggle you until you move house.
     

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