Noggin for flooring joint support

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Londoner, Dec 28, 2004.

  1. Londoner

    Londoner Member

    What is the correct way to make and fit a noggin for support of chipboard flooring joint?
     
  2. panlid

    panlid New Member

    londoner are you talking about a haveing you joists on show ie.not laid floor yet in which case just measure gap and cut and fit, nailing from back or spiked in the corners, of are you talking about repairing a floor you have had to open up?
     
  3. Chippy John

    Chippy John New Member

    You don't need any noggins on the long joints, but where the ends of boards meet in a gap between joists it's best to put a noggin to support the joint. just one at the centre of the board will suffice.

    Structurally it's not necessary, the chipboard is designed to carry itself but it can creak and squeak after a while without a noggin. Always use plenty of glue on the chipboard joints.
     
  4. Ant1

    Ant1 New Member

    Its always best to fit noggins in any timber joist floors to stop the joists twisting with temperature and stop movement when walked on. As for fitting noggins where chipboard meets if it is proper T&G Chipboard sheets just cut the correct end of board to finish on the nearest joists. Personally i would never ever leave an unsupported joint as there is no strenth to the chipboard anyway. all the T&G joint is doing is joining the board so it therefore becomes a sheet of chipboard again so still has the same weakness in it.
     
  5. Ant1

    Ant1 New Member

    Back Again its always best to nog out and if its a new floor and you are planning to tile the chipboard floor make sure they are nailed or screwed at 400 centres.
     
  6. Londoner

    Londoner Member

    SID, re your comment, I'm talking about a floor that has been opened up. T & G on joists, but joint on ends that are 90 degrees to the joists. How is it best to make and fit them?
     
  7. panlid

    panlid New Member

    sorry londoner i am getting confused. have you had to take up some t&g lenghts for access and you need to put noggins in to support new ends where there is no support?
     
  8. imindoors

    imindoors New Member

    Right then, this'll set the cat among the pigeons.

    If all you want to do is ensure a level where the 2 bits of T&G meet I don't think you really need a noggin. What I do is put a spare bit of T&G about 4 inches (Oops sorry 100mm) wide and the same length as the join to be supported under the floor which is still fixed so that it is half under the floor and half exposed. Then put a couple of screws through to fasten it. Then lay your new piece of T&G on top and screw through that to the support to make a firm and level join.

    As I understand you, the rest of the floor has been laid so that it will be properly supported as the long joints run at right angles to the joists.

    Hope this helps.
     
  9. Londoner

    Londoner Member

    Yes SID, that’s the query. Also, re imindoors response, that is how I might normally do it, so want to know from the experts what is the correct way and what precisely is a real “noggin”. Any pictures on a carpenter type web site perhaps too?
     
  10. Chippy John

    Chippy John New Member

    If you want to remove sections of chipboard flooring the best way is to cut it on a joist, no need for any noggins at all.

    If you've already cut some out, cut it back to the centre of a joist and fit a new bit.
     
  11. Londoner

    Londoner Member

    Chippy John, I'm talking about the gap between joists that you mention in your earlier post (where non joist supported edges might meet). Also, for future reference, I'd like to know from the experts please.
     
  12. panlid

    panlid New Member

    me thinks wind up
     
  13. Londoner

    Londoner Member

    Well, it may be nearly 03:40 on New Years day but thought I’d mention, solved it. Talking to a chippy mate at party early tonight, he enlightened me and now much clearer. Happy New Year.
     
  14. Chippy John

    Chippy John New Member

    solved it. Talking to a chippy
    mate at party early tonight, he enlightened me and
    now much clearer.

    So how about enlightening the rest of us, as we obviously know sweet **** all about it!

    After all, I'm never too proud to learn something new even after well over 40 years nailing bits of wood together.
     
  15. Londoner

    Londoner Member

    His method, which I am assured is the "correct method", is simply to use another piece of joist (which apparently must be at least two thirds of the size of the existing joists) and length to cover the span between joists. Simple position it half under the board that is already in position and screw into adjacent joists. Now tell me about how you make and install a noggin?
     
  16. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Christ!!!!!!!!??????? I'm off up the shed to have a practice.

    Handyandy - really
     
  17. Chippy John

    Chippy John New Member

    quote

    His method, which I am assured is the "correct
    method", is simply to use another piece of joist
    (which apparently must be at least two thirds of the
    size of the existing joists) and length to cover the
    span between joists. Simple position it half under
    the board that is already in position and screw into
    adjacent joists.

    Sounds suspiciously like a noggin to me, unless I've misunderstood your explanation, in which case it's a cleat.
     
  18. panlid

    panlid New Member

    its a wind up
     
  19. bathstyle

    bathstyle Active Member

    Thats what I thought,

    Had a reply written out for this one but then thaught..naaah!!
     
  20. Londoner

    Londoner Member

    Thanks Chippy John for a sensible responce. Not a wind up. For the non-carpenters amongst us, even the basic terminology and applications sometimes need a little explanation.
     

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