Outside Lighting Feed

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by Spike44, Sep 11, 2019 at 11:19 AM.

  1. Spike44

    Spike44 New Member

    Hi
    I am wanting to put a couple of LED Floodlights along the front of my house and a couple more in a barn that is next to the gable end of my house (3 meters away) , the only feed I have outside is a small floodlight on the gable end , (next to the barn) this is run off the house lower light circuit .
    It would be most probably be ok ( I think ) if it was only going to supply 4x 30W LED Floodlights , but someone could change that to a higher wattage later ! .

    The problem I have is that the CU is in the middle of the house , so very difficult to take another feed from it .
    So what I was thinking was taking a feed from the lower ring main ( a lower floor socket next to the gable end , and somehow fitting it into a 5A fused spur , using 1.5mm2 cable , then take my feed from that to the 2 light circuits outside ! .



    Spike44
     
  2. Hans_25

    Hans_25 Active Member

    I'd just run the additional lights off the existing lighting circuit. 4 additional 30W LED floodlights will amount to 120W and the LEDs are inbuilt so little chance of them being changed for 500W halogen floodlights. Someone would have the change the complete unit and be a right numpty to use high power inefficient 500W halogen lights!
     
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  3. Spike44

    Spike44 New Member

    Hi
    Thanks for your reply , could you recomend some 1.5mm2 cable to do the runs in , would have to be weather and UV resistant has it can get quite heavy up were we are and something that his not too thick !
     
  4. spirits are real 2016

    spirits are real 2016 Well-Known Member

    yes look for fish pond flex screwfix sells it and it's designed for outside use....
     
  5. Hans_25

    Hans_25 Active Member

  6. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    You could use Hi-Tuf cable or FP 200 alternatively you could use 20mm plastic conduit.
    You could also run a catenary wire across to the barn with Hi-Tuf fixed to that.Prefer not to use flex for long runs, and just for connection ie wiska box to fitting.

    Arctic flex is for power tools/extension leads and not for fixed wiring running round a house.
     
    Spike44 likes this.
  7. Spike44

    Spike44 New Member

    Thanks everyone for posting replies to me , just one more question could I use 1.0mm2 cable for the house n barn ? .


    cheers
     
  8. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    You could, but I prefer to run 1.5mm as a matter of choice. As far as I am aware Hi-Tuff is not sold in 1.0mm and although 1.0mm FP200 does exist 1.5mm is the one which is normally stocked and 1.0 mm it seems would have to be ordered in. If you use Conduit you could use 1.0mm t&e in the Conduit although I would always use 1.5.

    It is your choice.
     
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  9. Spike44

    Spike44 New Member

    Hi

    What about this cable for the house : H07RN-F Type 4-Core Rubber Cable Black 1.5mm² , need 4 core for a switch on the house , just below the floods ?.
     
  10. Spike44

    Spike44 New Member

  11. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    I would run a 20mm black conduit down to the switch from a Wiska box. You will need a box at the light anyway to join the cables, therefore it would be better to use conduit and then use whatever cable you need even singles.
     
    Spike44 likes this.
  12. Spike44

    Spike44 New Member

    Yes I agree with you , the only thing with the 20mm Conduit is it is a bit ugly down the front of the house , but it will protect the cable from knocks by people , apart from the cable running along near the top of the house ! .
     
  13. robertpstubbs

    robertpstubbs Well-Known Member

    Black conduit between black Wiskas and black lighting doesn’t look too bad.

    Also using singles in conduit allows you the flexibility to share CPCs and neutrals keeping the total wiring to a minimum, and the ability to make changes easily.
     
  14. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    Each circuit should have it's own CPC and Neutral. The CPC'S and Neutrals should not be shared between circuits, which you seem to be advocating.
     
  15. robertpstubbs

    robertpstubbs Well-Known Member

    Different lights on the same circuit but switched separately could share a neutral.
     
  16. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    That is not a shared Neutral.
     
  17. robertpstubbs

    robertpstubbs Well-Known Member

    Compared with running multiple T+Es each with it’s own neutral and sheathing it is sharing.
     
  18. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    Ask an Electrician what a shared Neutral is, because you certainly do not seem to know.
     
  19. robertpstubbs

    robertpstubbs Well-Known Member

    I didn’t refer to a “shared neutral” in that it has a specific meaning, but simply to sharing cabling to be economic.
     

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