Oven and hob connected directly too cooker switch

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by Adark, Jun 14, 2018.

  1. Adark

    Adark New Member

    Hi everyone

    I have just brought a new oven and hob calculating up to 12kw together. I have spoke to an electrician who gave me a price to connect them.

    He asked if I have a connection unit, I advised I was not sure. But I have a cooker switch.

    Basically everything I had was fine, but have now found out that the connections for my old hob and oven have been made directly to the cooker switch as I don't have an outlet plate. The reason I replaced these alliances was because the RCD started tripping out a week ago after over 7 years.

    I want to know if the way the wiring directly to the cooker switch is correct.

    1 cooker switch, no outlet plate and 2 additional wires (Oven and hob) connected directly into this.
     
  2. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

  3. Dam0n

    Dam0n Active Member

  4. Adark

    Adark New Member


    Hi
    It’s a 6mm cable, I’ve had an electrician out who said it’s not ideal without the cooker outlet, but that should not cause a trip as it’s in a 45amp switch.

    He’s now advised a test on cables to ensure no break in there. The to change the switch, if that does not work it’s a faulty appliance.

    I’ve heard a lot about the dual cooker connection, but would it not do the same as a normal cooker connection

    The oven is 5.3kw and hob is 6kw
     
  5. Adark

    Adark New Member

  6. rogerk101

    rogerk101 Well-Known Member

    12kW / 240V = 50A ...

    ... remind me why 45A devices are being considered?
     
  7. Dam0n

    Dam0n Active Member

    Diversity?
     
  8. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    Don’t forget to apply diversity.
     
  9. Adark

    Adark New Member

    Would that be 30% diversity ?
     
  10. rogerk101

    rogerk101 Well-Known Member

    50A - 45A = 5A
    5A / 50A x 100 = 10%
    ... so more like 10% diversity
     
  11. Sparkielev

    Sparkielev Well-Known Member

    Not sure why you think the single outlet is a better option than the dual outlet, i find the dual a much neater option then cramming 3 cables into a single outlet
     
    KIAB likes this.
  12. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    So messy cramming 3 cables into a single outlet.
     
  13. Dam0n

    Dam0n Active Member

    might be a single outlet but it has absolutely massive terminals that can easily accommodate 3 lots of 6mm. front facing terminals with a cover plate makes life easy
     
  14. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    You are concerned about RCD tripping. Anyway, replacing the appliances should resolve it. It is usually a faulty appliance when this happens as there is little to affect the wiring unless it has been damaged by external factors. Connecting two appliances on one circuit is allowed. The fact its been connected directly to the 45A cooker switch is not an issue, it can be done that way. The alternative is to use a dual outlet plate but all that does is make life easier it doesn't add or detract anything to the circuit in terms of safety. Standard circuits for cookers, wired in 6mm32 T&E are normally good for total loads up to 50kW. As other posts have mentioned, the diversity of loading on the circuit means it will never be overloaded and even it it was it would simply trip before any damage was sustained to wiring.
     
    Adark likes this.
  15. Adark

    Adark New Member

    Thank you everyone, as I'll be changing them both, the electrician has advised he will check to see if there are any breaks, if not once I brought the new appliances he will fit them in as he too thinks it's either the socket itself or the appliance
     
  16. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

     
  17. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    Typo there UP, I know you meant to say 15kW.
     
  18. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    :rolleyes: 15kW is indeed what I meant. 'pologies.
     
    seneca likes this.

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