Plasterboard which side

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by chris roast, Mar 2, 2007.

  1. chris roast

    chris roast Member

    hi, got some lafarge plasterboard, i am putting up, i persume the ivory or white side is the side you have facing you, so you can skim the board, so what is the grey or dark side used for?
     
  2. -chippy_john

    -chippy_john New Member

    so what is the
    grey or dark side used for?

    It's to stop the middle falling out.
     
  3. nearnwales

    nearnwales Member

    grey or dark side used for?? F%ck all !!!
     
  4. ChaserRenos

    ChaserRenos New Member

    Finished paper like the white side is more expensive than the rough paper like the back, hence only one side is done with finished paper.
     
  5. Stoday

    Stoday New Member

    The dark side goes inside so that you skim the outside, which is the white side. If the wall you are boarding is an outside wall, you still put the dark side inside, that is, against the inside of the outside wall.

    Do not try to board the outside of the outside wall. It dosn't matter if you put the dark side inside (i.e. to the outside wall) or the outside; you won't make a successful job because the plasterboard is not suitable for outside. Inside walls are OK, but you have to have the outside (i.e. white side) of the plasterboard outside and not against the inside wall. Both sides of the inside wall can be boarded because unlike the outside wall, both sides are inside. Remember that the plasterboard is not like this and has an inside and an outside. The inside goes to the inside wall on both sides, so you have an inside wall with an outside plasterboard showing on both sides.

    So you see, it's all easy to understand...

    :)
     
  6. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    The dark side goes inside so that you skim the
    outside, which is the white side. If the wall you are
    boarding is an outside wall, you still put the dark
    side inside, that is, against the inside of the
    outside wall.

    Do not try to board the outside of the outside wall.
    It dosn't matter if you put the dark side inside
    (i.e. to the outside wall) or the outside; you won't
    make a successful job because the plasterboard is not
    suitable for outside. Inside walls are OK, but you
    have to have the outside (i.e. white side) of the
    plasterboard outside and not against the inside wall.
    Both sides of the inside wall can be boarded because
    unlike the outside wall, both sides are inside.
    Remember that the plasterboard is not like this and
    has an inside and an outside. The inside goes to the
    inside wall on both sides, so you have an inside wall
    with an outside plasterboard showing on both sides.

    So you see, it's all easy to understand...

    :)



    Clear as a bell. 'Duhhng' :)


    Only put the white decorable side to the wall if the mice are paying for the decoration, then tape and plaster it first.


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  7. andyplast

    andyplast New Member

    gettin sick of answering these types of questions now!

    they have even started to label PB now so f*ck wits know which side to face out.

    aye-carumba
     
  8. nearnwales

    nearnwales Member

    your sick and you've only done 21 posts I've been answering these for a year now
     
  9. dj.

    dj. New Member

    and i have been telling people even longer but they still don't listen, it is really simple just read the f**g board it says on it!!
     
  10. Stoday

    Stoday New Member

    I like to have the opportunity to tell someone which side goes inside and outside according to inside and outside walls.

    I've lost count of the number of times I've done this on SFx.

    :)
     
  11. nearnwales

    nearnwales Member

    what do you mean according to inside or outside walls doesn't matter if its internal or external walls its always the same way around
     
  12. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    :)


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  13. you're all wrong....the dark/uneven side is for skimming over...the light side is to provide a smooth/flat surface for when skimming isn't required
     
  14. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    'Ere we go.



    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  15. gangman

    gangman New Member

    Many years ago it was dark side for plaster, light side for artex. Now it's light side for every thing.
     
  16. nearnwales

    nearnwales Member

    I give up I don't give a flying ** anymore I know how to plaster board

    [Edited by: forum admin]
     
  17. mungo.

    mungo. New Member

    LEAVE IT, LEAVE IT!! ITS NOT WORTH IT!!
    the last time this one came up i had to have 3 weeks off with stress!
     
  18. MRWONG006

    MRWONG006 New Member

    One side for plaster one side for decorating as marked on board
     
  19. nearnwales

    nearnwales Member

    right there is one side and one side only and its the side which doesn't have a paper lip on it so if you can see the paper lip you have the wrong side .

    That skimming , taping, painting, artexing everything you only use one side for EVERYTHING you do .


    So lets get it right you use the side which doesn't have a paper lip.

    The reason is the moister can lift the paper lip and cause it to blow
     
  20. plastererboy

    plastererboy New Member

    Hey speaking of plasterboarding, a bloke I know locally who works as a plasterer was doing his own loft conversion and got a mate of mine to do the carpentry etc and my mate being a joiner has done plasterboarding in his line of work couldn't believe it when the so called plasterer started lining his loft using 9.5mm boards and the wrong way around with huge gaps between the boards some with 10mm gaps at one corner and touching at the other corner etc! Couldn't believe his own eyes watching him doing the plasterboarding!! The joins didnt even meet on the rafters too!! So bit of bounce at the joints!!

    This person has the gall to call himself a "qualified and timeserved plasterer"!!!
     

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