Position of Isolating Switch

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by azizrasul, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. DiggerB

    DiggerB New Member

    YES,,,but they do not cut the power TOO the appliance.....***!!!
     
  2. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    The shower knob doesn't cut the power TOO the appliance!

    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     
  3. DiggerB

    DiggerB New Member

    Well done!! 
     
  4. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Oh I could go on, but I don't think I need to.....

    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     
  5. DiggerB

    DiggerB New Member

    No please dont,, I think you and a couple of others are without doubt,, missing the point completely....
     
  6. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Keep DiggingB.
     
  7. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    I don't know how some of these threads go on and on and on like this! It really isn't that complicated to site an isolation switch in a sensible location is it.
     
  8. Lokkars Daisy

    Lokkars Daisy New Member

    Sen, it's no big deal, however it is clear that the regs DO NOT RQUIRE A LOCAL ISOLATOR for kitchen appliances,, apart for the cooker/hob.
    I think Digger B has prolonged the thread with his illogical take on the situation.
    And it is aggravating to hear that a building inspector insisted that JP installed local isolation.
    I can assure you that this building inspector would have been required to prove his point should it had been me and not JP that he was dealing with,,twerp
     
  9. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    I can think of one instance where it is useful to have a remote isolating switch in a kitchen. Fridge and freezer. Since these appliances are always on and don't tend to have a separate on/off switch installed on the appliance it makes sense to put one on as a functional device to switch the fridge or freezer off easily. In aALL other instances it is definitely NOT necessary. :)
     
  10. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    I see some.

    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     
  11. Lokkars Daisy

    Lokkars Daisy New Member

    Yes sen, better still have a dedicated socket for the fridge freezer on the non rcd side, so in the event of an rcd trip then the freezer will not defrost. Also a local isolating switch is not required as should the feezer need to be switched off then this can be done by flipping of a dedicated mcb
     
  12. DiggerB

    DiggerB New Member

    So now your going to disregard the fact that all sockets should be protected by an RCD/RCBO TO THE 17TH EDITION??????????  I suppose your going to try and tell me now that theres no Reg for that either??  If you want to put a freezer on the non RCD side put it on a seperate circuit on a seperate switch fuse unit......not a socket...

    Oh and by the way the socket you speak of would be the local isolator,,,you know one of those isolaters that appliances dont need.....


    Quote....better still have a dedicated socket for the fridge freezer on the non rcd side,  Unquote..
     
  13. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    Nothing wrong with having a dedicated socket for a freezer which is not rcd protected Digger, you really do need to do some reading of the 17th regs book!
     
  14. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    DiggerB, the fact that 'dedicated' was used, suggests its own circuit.

    Plugs make for easy removal  for whatever reason(cleaning behind/taking outside for defrosting?). Joe public don't always want to be undoing accessories and disconnecting the cables to appliances.

    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     
  15. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    Yup, I'm going to tell you of a reg that allows a fridge or freezer to be put on a dedicated circuit without an RCD. 411.3.3 exception (b). You put the circuit on its own and you label it as fridge or freezer and you omit the RCD. Happy now? :) You are learning a lot from your rants aren't you.
     
  16. Whome?

    Whome? New Member

    As others have said you can have a Non-RCD socket for dedicated equipment, however you would have to ensure that no other part of that circuit requiered RCD protection. IE: buried cables in a wall.. So really the dedicated socket in a domestic situation would have to be surfaced wired as providing mechanical protection can be a bit of a pain.
     
  17. DiggerB

    DiggerB New Member

    Regulation 411.3.3.
    States that  additional protection by means of a 30mA RCD is to be provided for all  socket outlets with a rated current not exceeding 20A for use by  ordinary persons. The only exceptions allowed are for socket outlets for  use under the supervision of ?skilled? or ?instructed persons? e.g.  some commercial / industrial locations, or a specific labelled socket  provided for connection of a particular item of equipment, e.g. a  freezer circuit.

    I think you need to re read the regulation and pay attention to the highlighted bit above....

    Reading and quoting a regulation is one thing,, actually understanding it and gaining the relevant information from it/them is something else....heres a clue... define skilled and instructed persons....
     
  18. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    OR is the important word here Digger, " or  a specifically labelled socket for connection of a particular item of equipment, eg a freezer circuit
     
  19. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    Here we go again. No you wouldn't need to guard against buried cables in a wall. The reg is quiote specific. It is a standalone reg. It allows a circuit to a fridge to be installed without an RCD. You are talking out of your backside.
     
  20. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    You know, something sine, small wonder there are so many crazy installations out there with people like DiggerB and Whome on the case. Unbelievable. :)

    I was in a house today where a fuseboard had been changed (not by me). A 10mm2 cable going to a socket where there was once a cooker control had been put on a 16A mcb. I have converted it back to a cooker circuit and now I've got to put the dammed 32A back on. Why they put a 16A mcb on because they don't understand electrics. They don't understand that a 10mm2 cable can be put on a 32A mcb for a socket. Idiots. The industry is full of 'em. Two on this thread proving the point.
     

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