Power in loft for CCTV NVR etc

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by Seelda, Dec 25, 2020.

  1. RolandK

    RolandK Screwfix Select

    Not sure I've ever seen a round pin to square pin adaptor. Kind of defeats the object!
    Maybe put 3 pin round plug on the lead of a multi socket extension as a compromise?
    But I guess by the time you've done that you might as well put 13a sockets via an FCU.
    Sod it, I'd just run a spur up there off the upstairs final ring!!
     
  2. Arthur Dent

    Arthur Dent Member


    Someone no doubt would try these

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/TEC-UK-Ada...JGP14QE4ZGA&psc=1&refRID=HCN22MBE3JGP14QE4ZGA
     
  3. Teki

    Teki Screwfix Select

    FCU and socket(s) labelled is probably the best option if you don't want to run a new circuit up there. If the new owners fail to see the label, the fuse will stop them using a high current appliance!

    NVRs often come with a power supply incorporating a plug.
     
  4. Banallsheds

    Banallsheds Well-Known Member

    Well I think it has been established that you should not do number 1 so do number 2. No point in 3 or 4 as you don’t need a ring up there.

    Don’t use a powerline adapter either. They can cause interference to your neighbours up to several hundred metres away. Run a cat5 cable up there.
     
  5. Bazza

    Bazza Screwfix Select

    Never heard that. Where’s the evidence.
     
    BiancoTheGiraffe likes this.
  6. Arthur Dent

    Arthur Dent Member

    Banallsheds, post: Don’t use a powerline adapter either. They can cause interference to your neighbours up to several hundred metres away. Run a cat5 cable up there.

    perhaps a case of this;

     
  7. Banallsheds

    Banallsheds Well-Known Member

  8. Arthur Dent

    Arthur Dent Member

    So ban plt is basically a group of amateur radio enthusiasts complaining about their frequencies being swamped. When I lived 3 doors down from an amateur radio enthusisast who's kit stopped any on receiving their TV signals when he was wittering over the airwaves. When I complained to him he told me that it was my problem and I should get it sorted out. He had told the other neighbouurs this previously. They are hypocrites.
     
  9. Banallsheds

    Banallsheds Well-Known Member

    So you don’t care if your bad technology ruins someone’s hobby?

    Regarding amateur radio stopping your TV working he was probably right that your equipment was faulty. The same thing would happen if you lived near a taxi company PMR. But did you complain to the relevant authorities or were you afraid they would find the amateur signals were clean and your equipment was indeed faulty?

    By the way PLT has notches on the amateur bands because the manufacturers know their equipment causes interference and that amateurs would complain. How cynical is that?

    Did you read the BBC white paper?

    https://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.p...te-owners-bad-powerline-network-adapters.html
     
  10. AnotherTopJob

    AnotherTopJob Screwfix Select

    I know a shortwave enthusiast who erected a 20ft aerial and said he had to use it at 2am as the neighbour's TV jumped off the wall!
    A washing machine or anything with a motor is just as likely to cause interference.
     
  11. Arthur Dent

    Arthur Dent Member

    Well you obviously didn't care that the amateur radio enthusiast didn't care about his ruining someone elses life. Yes we did all complain to the authorities and his kit was found to be faulty and he was prosecuted for it.
     
  12. Banallsheds

    Banallsheds Well-Known Member

    Well in that case you did the right thing. Usually though radio amateurs are very careful not to have faulty equipment but I suppose there are rouges in all walks of life.

    But getting back to PLT they do cause interference and you should not use it. Again I ask did you read the BBC white paper I linked to?
     
  13. Teki

    Teki Screwfix Select

    I think PLT is so widespread now with Sky and BT using in their set-top boxes, WiFi range extenders using it that it's unlikely people will avoid it.
     
  14. Arthur Dent

    Arthur Dent Member

    The question is have you? I only ask as it is from January 2011 that is 10 years ago NEXT month. The technology has moved along a lot since then, also even they admit that the results are pretty inconclusive.

    Once again it appears that you are making it up to suit your agenda.
     
  15. Banallsheds

    Banallsheds Well-Known Member

    Of course I’ve read it. The laws of physics have not changed in the last 9/10 years. Nor have ring main cables become screened, balanced, or terminated to their correct impedance. Put simply mains cables are not designed to carry data so if you use them for this they will radiate harmful interference.
     
  16. BiancoTheGiraffe

    BiancoTheGiraffe Screwfix Select

    The way I see it, if they emitted interference which caused a problem, they wouldn't be allowed...

    But they are, and they're widely sold and used.
     
    Bazza likes this.
  17. Bazza-spark

    Bazza-spark Screwfix Select

    I assume you mean ring finals.

    Like some forum members.
     
    Bazza and Comlec like this.
  18. Banallsheds

    Banallsheds Well-Known Member

    Lots of things are widely sold that cause serious harm. Tobacco and alcohol come to mind.
     
  19. Bazza-spark

    Bazza-spark Screwfix Select

    Lots of advice can cause serious harm, including yours.
     
  20. spinlondon

    spinlondon Screwfix Select

    I would not use a 5A fuse downstream of a 6A MCB.
    3A or 1A yes, or 5A with a 10A MCB.
     
    Bazza likes this.

Share This Page