Power Tools You Wouldn't Be Without

Discussion in 'Tool Talk' started by Joe95, Nov 1, 2016.

  1. SWBUILDERS

    SWBUILDERS Active Member

    There good and the trend ones are also decent
     
  2. SWBUILDERS

    SWBUILDERS Active Member

    I would also say that it's ideal for cutting close to walls (say when ripping up a water damaged floor) as you can cut 10mm way from the perimeter walls other festool owners may wince when the here I've been abusing such a peice of equipment :confused:

    I have heard that the Mafell plunge saw is the ultimate but the price of them is eye watering nearly double the price of the fessy
     
  3. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select


    Once I took the plunge(haha) ;) and bought the rail for my circular saw its as you said, opened up a new world of cutting accurately. No farting about with clamps and 6ft levels anymore, anti chip rubber seal on it too, no sliding about, brilliant!

    Incidentally my mate bought the larger mafell plunge saw, cost him over £800 with two guide rails to slot together, while I winced at the price he insists that it's worth every penny due to the extreme accuracy and ergonomics, and am yet to see him disappointed with any feature on it. Still, £800........o_O
     
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  4. Joe95

    Joe95 Screwfix Select

    KIAB you're right about the Freud blades - top quality and best I've used in the circular saw.
    --
    That's cool with the track saw Scott - I've seen so many people suggesting to use one on here - undercutting skirting was the most recent.
    How many tracks do you own - I've always thought 2 was the best place to start, and what's the grip like on them, i.e. Does it hold well on most woods without the need for clamps?
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2016
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  5. Joe95

    Joe95 Screwfix Select

    That's me at the moment! Haha
     
  6. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    It's always the same when considering buying tools that are more than a couple hundred quid and out of your comfort zone, agonizing and weighing up all the pros and cons for ages, then when you finally purchase it and give it a go, you'd never be without it and you wonder why you took so long to get it!
     
  7. SWBUILDERS

    SWBUILDERS Active Member

    Yeah I have 2 1400mm rails, that have connector bars with grub screws to connect them, as you can imagine with festool everything is an optional extra like the connectors and even the carry bag for the rails!!! They are fine for every thing I need Ripping full sheets down etc, even when cutting furrings out of 4.8m 8x2 you can chalk line and just move the rails down with precision, also due to the plung action you can plunge the blade without it spinning and roll it down the guild to align before you make a cut on a kitchen end panel or alike just to make sure no mishaps may occur :D

    Grip is good and there is adjustment on the tool of how tightly it grips to the rail itself determining how quickly it glides but the splinter Gaurd on both the rail and there is one on the tool that are consumables and need replacing fairly often obviously depending on use I do it once a month or fortnight if I'm doing finishing second fix work
     
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  8. Joe95

    Joe95 Screwfix Select

    Just had that experience - I brought the Dewalt framing nailer (didn't go with a passy with the maintaince and gas + didn't think I would use it too much) but it's always with me now! Such a good invstment and I wouldnt be without it from now on.
     
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  9. SWBUILDERS

    SWBUILDERS Active Member

    Yeah my first fix nailer pretty much battered and unsure whether to get a dewalt gas gasless jobby of stay with the new paslode, tried both the paslode is a monster loads of power but the dewalt prob suffer way less jamming and dust problems!! So can't make my mind up!!!
     
  10. SWBUILDERS

    SWBUILDERS Active Member

    Lol pretty much the same post :D:D:D:p
     
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  11. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    Cordless Dewalt nailer, brilliant, but it does take a while to bed in from new, puts the Plastode to shame.:)

    My old Plastode use to hate the cold, use to misfire.
     
  12. SWBUILDERS

    SWBUILDERS Active Member

    Yeah I tried it for a day and it did what it needed It just felt that it was lacking the power of the paslode, but it was lighter and can't see myself throwing it out the window after it jams for the 5th time in a day
     
  13. Joe95

    Joe95 Screwfix Select

    Scott, I'll keep picking your brain if you don't mind! Everyone mentions no rip out and no splintering, is this true? (with good blades obviously :) ) and I can see the point about saving time. Also, with the blades, are they standard, i.e circular saw ones with its of teeth?
     
  14. Joe95

    Joe95 Screwfix Select

    I was Lucky there I had a fencing job that was 120ft - which ran it in well, was hammering home nails at the start but by the end it was buring them every time.
     
  15. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    Just 160mm saw blades in TS55
     
  16. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    Have tried the dewalt, thought it was ok, but thought the bump nail feature would be the first thing to go wrong, someone else I know owns one and a paslode and he hates the dewalt, never uses it. Also bought the hitachi, lasted two days and I sent it back, maybe ok for the odd fence or something but not consistent construction work. I own a paslode, but wish I'd bought the Hilti nailer, not just for the warranty and level of service, but it takes a hell of a battering from what I've seen.
     
  17. HandyDoug

    HandyDoug New Member

    I could not live without my combined electronic mini workbench, door holder, hop-up, foot-stool and battery recycler.
    Only use the Radio2 and Absolute Radio Seventies buttons so not sure what the rest do. I also sometimes use the batteries in things like drills.[​IMG]
     
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  18. SWBUILDERS

    SWBUILDERS Active Member

    Hi mate yeah no worries, yeah as Kiab says it's a 160mm blade not many places do them I know Screwfix don't or didn't last time I looked, trend or Freud, 48 tooth good for second fix work

    As for rip out I wouldn't say absolutely no rip out on certain materials like your really nasty 15mm landlords kitchen melamine chipboard end panels even if you have brand new splinter Gaurds you may need to do cut these upside down but with the better quality MDF kitchen stuff it's no problem and the beauty is you can go though in passes as if routing
     
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  19. Joe95

    Joe95 Screwfix Select

    I'm no expert on the gas - I've borrowed them, but not owned one. The dewalt is suited to less frequent use id say. The paslodes are better with constant use and take more of a beating. The dewalt doesn't seem as strong built but I don't put my tools through rough environments. The IM360ci is lighter, the dewalt is more comfortable in the hand but heavier
     
  20. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    Can't beat the Freud 160mm for quailty, 48 tooth is about the most you will see on a blade that size.
     

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