Price increases

Discussion in 'Just Talk' started by Rick1632, Sep 7, 2022.

  1. Rick1632

    Rick1632 Active Member

    So everything has been going up in price over hte last few years, but presumably some things more than others? e.g. I know timber prices went through the roof during lockdown. What about windows, bricks tiles etc?

    Any prices likely to come down in the future - i.e. high cost due to supply shortage, or is it all baked in now do you think?

    Asking because I'm about to take on a huge renovation project and thinking about which jobs to tackle first and whether worth hanging on for others in the hope of lower costs.
     
    Kreg92 and Turbofan RB211 like this.
  2. Nanook

    Nanook Screwfix Select

    I have been worried about this too.

    But I reckon you can still bag yourself bargains by searching for unwanted or second hand stuff in good condition online if you’re willing to go pick the stuff up yourself.
     
    Kreg92 likes this.
  3. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    Timber and sheet material more or less doubled, steel has gone up by half, masonry up by a third or so. Labour increased by 20%+. Unless a recession kicks in, there won’t be a light at the end of the expensive tunnel.
     
  4. Rick1632

    Rick1632 Active Member

    Well, I think a recession is pretty much a given - the only question is how deep and how long will it be :(

    However, can't see inflation coming down any time soon so I imagine labour costs will keep rising, but perhaps demand will fall.
     
  5. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Screwfix Select

    Never mind, be happy we have Liz to help us out now. :) Just practicing my irony.
     
    WeCanDoIt and gadget man like this.
  6. Astramax

    Astramax Super Member

    Good pal of mine built a huge extension for someone I introduced to him a year before Covid, a couple of weeks ago he told me the same extension today would cost in the area of 60% more.:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::(:(
     
  7. Bazza-spark

    Bazza-spark Screwfix Select

    To be fair, when you're hemorrhaging and crippled the best thing is a Truss :eek:
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2022
    gadget man and Astramax like this.
  8. Astramax

    Astramax Super Member

    Don't believe it....tis not the country I was born into! :cool::cool::cool:
     
    koolpc likes this.
  9. Bazza-spark

    Bazza-spark Screwfix Select

    No, I'm not convinced either. The next few weeks should give us an idea.
     
  10. Astramax

    Astramax Super Member

    Yes...but no rose tinted specs!
     
  11. Bazza-spark

    Bazza-spark Screwfix Select

    Mine are blue tinted to save me when looking at the screen lol.
     
    koolpc likes this.
  12. BiancoTheGiraffe

    BiancoTheGiraffe Screwfix Select

    Surely she's got to be better than the alternatives?!
     
  13. Rick1632

    Rick1632 Active Member

    Almost her first item was to sack the hugely experienced and respected Treasury Secretary Tom Scholar because he was "orthodox". By this she means he disagreed (along with pretty much all economists) that her plans to cut taxes would achieve what she hopes they will. The general view is that they will simply add to inflation, yet do nothing for those struggling to pay the bills. She's basically trying to emulate Thatcher by doing what Thatcher did, but in an entirely different set of circumstances, and it seems unlikely that Thatcher would have been anything like as stupid. Anyone who disagrees will be sacked, so you end up with the stupidest people in key positions because you have to be stupid to agree. This at a time when even a government of geniuses would be struggling to set our economy right with global headwinds being what they are. I doubt she'll last 6 months before civil unrest triggers a Tory panic and they sack her.
     
    quasar9 likes this.
  14. Astramax

    Astramax Super Member

    At least Mrs Thatcher new how to deliver a speech with passion and conviction in her voice......not all monotone like Truss, well perhaps she'll improve.;)
     
  15. quasar9

    quasar9 Screwfix Select

    Sadly recession has kicked in (two successive quarters of decline) but high inflation and wage pressures is masking the situation. Businesses and households continue to stretch themselves, hoping that energy prices will drop back to their old levels. However this economic stretch is a bit like a rubber band, it will stretch to a certain point before snapping. Things will hit home around Xmas when energy costs despite the current government’s intervention will mop up surplus household cash with Xmas expenses taking up anything left. The chancellor has to be very innovative throwing out established methods of controlling inflation and promoting growth but sadly the new chancellor is a historian (albeit a very good one) and has little experience in hardcore finance.
     
    Jord86 likes this.
  16. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Screwfix Select

    Rising prices and the hope that they will return to their original level is a bit like stretching a spring, Hook's Law applies, stretch it too far and it won't return to its original position.
     
  17. Astramax

    Astramax Super Member

    Rising prices are Covid handouts payback!

    Given to one hand then taken back by the other.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2022
    BiancoTheGiraffe likes this.
  18. quasar9

    quasar9 Screwfix Select

    My suspicion on the new chancellors grasp of economics (post #15) has proved to be correct as the Pound dives against a basket of international currencies. It’s not my opinion that matters but those of the economists all round the world who advice their respective governments, banks and currency traders.

    I just hope I am wrong on these changes accelerating the rate of inflation thereby pushing up prices.

    the minister of health seems equally detached from reality, between cause and effect. Doctor shortage will be relived by pharmacists. I guess the pharmacists role will be taken over by an unqualified assistant, after all how difficult can it be ? Read the prescriptions (now electronic so you no longer have to decipher doctors spidery and illegible handwriting) and reach for the shelf :eek:! Guess the assistants role would be handed over to a tame dog :rolleyes:. possibly an improvement over some surly illiterate assistants who don’t even have a clue of what’s behind in the shelf behind them yet ask aimless and unrelated questions !
     
  19. BiancoTheGiraffe

    BiancoTheGiraffe Screwfix Select

    The pound will have dived regardless... The problem we have a load of rich economists who just have to voice their opinions... People panic, the markets tank and those same economists make a fortune like they always do!

    I highly recommend watching The Big Short, it gives a fascinating insight into how the world's money works
     
    Abbadon2001 likes this.
  20. quasar9

    quasar9 Screwfix Select

    The markets have always reacted like Jones the butcher in Dads Army ! Panic at first opportunity while shouting “Don’t Panic”. In this game, those in the know and big money always win with the ordinary small time investor that takes the hit. Casino economics where the house always wins, it has to as otherwise there is no house.

    Yes the greenback has been surging against all currencies in the last few weeks but the sudden drop from 1.13 yesterday to 1.09 today speaks volumes. Don’t forget the oil and gas are purchased in dollars further putting pressure on the energy prices. While the govt may have put a cap for a few years, their borrowing on the international markets will increase further putting pressure on balance of payment.

    when a currency is in trouble (as were many South American currencies in the 80’s) Banks lend only in dollars to stop inflation eroding their assets as well as putting up the rates. Furthermore, sovereign debts are no longer seen as cast iron guarantee, although UK still has high credit rating
     

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