Putting up skirting board

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by legit, Feb 13, 2005.

  1. Mr Mike

    Mr Mike New Member

    :^O..................................100 !

    (sorry, couldn't resist.........)
     
  2. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Now give it a little tap. you can give it a tap to
    force it in by 1.5mm EASILY(the quoted gap after
    shrinkage-according to some).
    That won't stop the gap opening, as the face of the
    skirting shrinks back towards the wall & the mitre
    will open up.
    The quoted shrinkage is fact, ask any tradesaman!
    Just give it up, internal mitres open up more than
    scribing it's a fact.



    And if you've tapped in in 1.5mm, when it shrink, that piece will spring back to meet the gap....so no gap.

    It's common sense.

    Try this. Press two fingers together so that the tops of your fingers are bent back. Now 'shrink' back one of them.

    The other finger will spring up to close the gap.

    Physics, laws ?



    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  3. splinter2

    splinter2 New Member

    God give me strength,
    Someone give me a gun so I can shot him
     
  4. mj

    mj Guest

    And if you've tapped in in 1.5mm, when it shrink, that piece will spring back to meet the gap....so no gap.

    Common sense my ****!
    The timber doesn't shrink like that.
    The heel of the mitre (against wall ) stays tight. As the timber shrinks the toe of the mitre opens, when the face of the skirting shrinks towards the wall (at 90 degrees to the face of the timber)
    If you were to measure the angle of a mitre on timber that has shrunk you would find that the angle is less than 45 degrees, which accounts for it opening up.
    That's the physics of timber movement.
     
  5. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    And if you've tapped in in 1.5mm, when it shrink,
    that piece will spring back to meet the gap....so no
    gap.

    Common sense my ****!
    The timber doesn't shrink like that.
    The heel of the mitre (against wall ) stays tight. As
    the timber shrinks the toe of the mitre opens, when
    the face of the skirting shrinks towards the wall (at
    90 degrees to the face of the timber)
    If you were to measure the angle of a mitre on timber
    that has shrunk you would find that the angle is less
    than 45 degrees, which accounts for it opening up.
    That's the physics of timber movement.



    Now THAT is total ballicks.


    Now you're saying that only the front shrinks.

    If the front shrinks back towards the wall, then the back shrinks forwards into the room. Thuis the angle will stay the same.

    Get back to your books. My God, you have a lot to learn.





    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  6. splinter2

    splinter2 New Member

    Handyandy,
    You had you're little say .I feel that it has got to the point whereyou are insulting not only any decent carpenter BUT also the carpentry industry as a whole.
    PS how long have you been a carpenter for?
     
  7. mj

    mj Guest

    Get back to your books. My God, you have a lot to learn.

    Perhaps you should try reading some proper joinery books instead of me, as i already know the mechanics of this?
    That's the whole point which you've seemingly missed in your stubborness. The heel of the joint tightens & the toe opens.
    Another example of this which can be seen during the summer months on the barge boards of houses where the bottom of the joint has opened up. This is why you often see a finial fitted to cover the joint.
     
  8. dual193

    dual193 New Member

    Who do yo think will win th F.A cup?
    ;)
     
  9. flyingscotsman

    flyingscotsman New Member

    Mr pandy, why do you insist on arguing with TRADESMEN when you make it blatently obvious you are not,you cut a 45 internal angle then take a 'bevel reading'???. then you proceed to bang it into said internal 1.5 mm,(do you do this before or after cutting any externals,)? Learn from these people,don't contradict them. HAYHO
     
  10. splinter2

    splinter2 New Member

    Who do yo think will win th F.A cup?

    WEST HAM ,of course
     
  11. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Mr pandy, why do you insist on arguing with TRADESMEN
    when you make it blatently obvious you are not,you
    cut a 45 internal angle then take a 'bevel
    reading'???. then you proceed to bang it into said
    internal 1.5 mm,(do you do this before or after
    cutting any externals,)? Learn from these
    people,don't contradict them. HAYHO



    If there is an external, it has yet to be cut to length, so you bang it in, mark your position, mark it 45ยบ, cut it, bang it in again, fix it.

    It's tight as hell, so if it shrinks, there is more than enough 'banged in' to allow for it.




    In the case of the expanding gap at the lower point of the gable apex bargeboard, I was always led to believe that this was because that part shrunk back more because it has been wetter(it's the place the water runs to and soaks in). We all know that dry wood will shrink LESS that wetted wood.

    Wood does that. It's called weathering. Protected wood does it less, ie the very tip of the apex is more protected from the elements.




    Anyone else ?



    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  12. plastic bertrand

    plastic bertrand Active Member

    You tellem, Andy
     
  13. splinter2

    splinter2 New Member

    Handyandy,
    You had you're little say .I feel that it
    eel that it has got to the point whereyou are
    insulting not only any decent carpenter BUT also the
    carpentry industry as a whole.
    PS how long have you been a carpenter for?
     
  14. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Insulting the industry ? Don't make me laugh. People read books and say, "This is what the book says."



    How many writers have you seen with chapped hands, worn knee-joints, builder's sun-tan. Most of the people that write these books, never did a day's hard graft. Yet people take their word as Gospel.


    When I do things, I think about why I'm doing it. I don't just mitre a joint because 'someone' once wrote it down in a book. Likewise scribing.


    When you fit wood, you allow for movement. That's nature.

    When you fit acclimatised wood, you allow little.

    When you fit wet wood, you allow for it to shrink when it drys out.

    When you fit dry wood, you allow for it to expand when it gets damp.


    So banging up tight new skirting is a GOOD idea.


    Take the scribed internal, when scribed over the bullnose(for example)and butted up to the other piece.

    This will also shrink and leave a gap, only moreso, because you can only 'bang up' to 'butted.'

    With the mitred joint, you can 'bang up' MORE than butted, and when shrinkage occurs, some reflexing will take up the space.


    Only, I think I said that before!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I wonder how many 'carpenters have ever even though about why they do the things they do ?


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  15. splinter2

    splinter2 New Member

    PS How long have YOU been a carpenter???????????????????
     
  16. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    How do you "bang in" your skirting without making a right mess of the external mitre with your hammer/mallet ?
     
  17. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    You've already banged it in once, so you don't have to bang it as hard when you have a mitre on it.

    I'm not talking banging it with a sledgehammer in the first place. I don't know if it was me that started saying 'bang' it in, but I'm sure I started off saying 'tap' it in.

    I first started working with wood 24 years ago, and hardly been out of the similar industries since. Not qualified carpenter, but you knew that.

    I see things as they are, not how people say they are, 'cause people can get it wrong, including me.
    No - really.


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  18. splinter2

    splinter2 New Member

    24years and you still don't know what you are doing,If you charge for you're carpentry services you should be ashamed
     
  19. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Never had a complaint about my workmanship in my life.



    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  20. splinter2

    splinter2 New Member

    yeaaa Ibet,
    If you can't get you're around the basics of carpentry ,eg.Ishudder to think what the rest of you're carpentry is like
     

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