question about fitting butt hinges

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by HIGHCROFT, Jan 2, 2007.

  1. HIGHCROFT

    HIGHCROFT Member

    what is the best way to fit 3" butt hinges on a internal door .ie is it preferable to rebate hinge into both casing & door -or to do a deeper rebate just on the door ..thanks
     
  2. ShabbaPlanks

    ShabbaPlanks Member

    House the hinge to both the door and frame/lining, the side of the hinge which has the most knuckles will go onto the frame.
    Check to see how the other doors are fitted, height of hinges and fitting method and try to accomadate this when fitting the new door.
    Good luck
     
  3. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    I may be in the minority but I only chop hinges into the door.Its how I was shown when I was an apprentice.Many old doors are not housed in the casings so it must be a recent trend.Never had a problem in the 20 years I have been hanging doors with this method.Also I was taught to put the main body of the hinge,with most knuckles,on the door.
    Feel free to disagree...;)
     
  4. foxy

    foxy New Member

    Feel free to disagree...;)

    I think I will. ;)

    Double letting hinges into the door can be quicker but the weight of the door is only supported by the screws into the liner and not the leaf of the hinge. You may not have any problems with lightweight doors but is bad practice (IMO of course). Leaf with the outer knuckles goes onto the frame.
     
  5. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Agree with foxy.

    Imagine, if you cut the rebate for the hinge on frame and door tight, you can practically leave the door there with no fixings(for a second or two). The screws are then just needed to keep it in the right place.

    Good job well done.


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  6. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    And in most cases, the larger part of a hinge/bracket whatever, will always be fitted to the frame/wall whatever.

    So if your hinge has 3 knuckles and 2 knuckles, 3 knuckles to the frame.



    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  7. starlight tiles

    starlight tiles New Member

    haven't met 1 joiner yet who chops double out the door.always chop out the door and frame bud.only jobbers or john wayne joinery chop out both from door.door will always drop this way.
     
  8. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    haven't met 1 joiner yet who chops double out the
    door.always chop out the door and frame bud.only
    jobbers or john wayne joinery chop out both from
    door.door will always drop this way.
    Can you explain how the door will always drop ?
    You obviously have little experience of fitting doors or you would have taken off hundreds of old doors as I have .Many not chopped into the frame and perfectly sound.
    I do not mind opinions as from Handyandy above but you are obviously clueless MAZ
    From my experience a heavy door which fails will always pull the top hinge out along with the screws,this will happen if the hinge is housed or not.
     
  9. starlight tiles

    starlight tiles New Member

    proper planning yorkie prevents very poor performance.you'd last about an hour on site doing it your way.yeeha.bucket of water for yorkie's horse
     
  10. starlight tiles

    starlight tiles New Member

    wrestling crocs springs to mind.
     
  11. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    proper planning yorkie prevents very poor
    performance.you'd last about an hour on site doing it
    your way.yeeha.bucket of water for yorkie's horse
    Ive lasted 20 years on site MAZ.Leave my horse out of this..;)
     
  12. starlight tiles

    starlight tiles New Member

    yeeha yorkie.yorkshire sites i take it
     
  13. Mr Mike

    Mr Mike New Member

    hic.....hic......can someone call me a cab please.....hic.......
     
  14. malcolm1417

    malcolm1417 New Member

    As im a yorkshireman,I must add my two pennyworth here and state that in all my 40odd years in the building industry as both a time served joiner and builder,I have never seen a door fitted by housing the hinge only within the door.Mr.Handy is correct in both his posts.
    It can be argued as to the spacings at top and bottom of the door for hinging, but to not recess the hinge into frame is just plain lazy and unprofessional.
     
  15. peters

    peters New Member

    The only time you dont cut the hinges into the frame is when the casing is an odd thickness ie. too thin 1/2" maybe. I have experienced this on old victorian buildings at the university.

    Cutting the hinges in may leave little timber for the screws to grip on.

    But its very rare....
     
  16. starlight tiles

    starlight tiles New Member

    must be just you yorkshire boy double chopping out the door.poor practice son.top up course required.
     
  17. Mof

    Mof Guest

    I do both methods, for thin steel hinges on normal interior doors I usualy just let the hinge into the door but of course for decent brass or nice hinges say on a hardwood front door I sink the hinges into the frame as well. As for the door dropping if the hinge is not let into the frame that is rubbish, I once went to trim a door over a new carpet which must have been hung for at least 95 years and the hinges ONLY EVER had 1 screw in each hinge (there was no screw holes in the frame apart from the one in each hinge)
     
  18. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    As im a yorkshireman,I must add my two pennyworth
    here and state that in all my 40odd years in the
    building industry as both a time served joiner and
    builder,I have never seen a door fitted by housing
    the hinge only within the door.Mr.Handy is correct in
    both his posts.
    It can be argued as to the spacings at top and bottom
    of the door for hinging, but to not recess the hinge
    into frame is just plain lazy and unprofessional.
    After reading this have been out and about today thinking maybe I have been imagining things and these are my observations..
    All the hinges on the internal doors on my 1950s semi are housed into the door only,the external doors are housed into the casings.
    I am currently renovating a 1960s bungalow,I was working there today and checked the doors,all are housed into the doors only.There is a hardwood conservatory added at some time and the hinges are not housed into the frame.
    I also rent out a back to back which was built in 1886 and as it is empty at the moment I was round today to collect any post and out of curiosity I checked the doors.The internal doors are not housed into the frame and neither is the external.One of the doors at the foot of the stairs looks like the original from the 1800s and its hinges are housed fully in the door.
    Three different houses in Yorkshire,looked at in one day,yet Yorkshires answer to Ray Charles,Malcolm has never seen a door hinge fitted fully into the door in 40 years .
     
  19. joesoap

    joesoap New Member

    Hi crofty
    The norm for butts is to set your gauge to 'half ball' both ways and and check to door And frame . That is and always has been the way although I have seen variations here and there over the years but no 'butts' about it just do it ! Cheers !
     
  20. goldenboy

    goldenboy Super Member

    Maybe yorkshireboy you just have a very bad memory and you in fact fitted all of the doors that you have reeled off. seriously though it is bad practice to not let the hinge into both the jamb and the stile. It is a stronger more secure way to do it. Plus it looks a bit naff to see the edges of the hinge in my opinion. Also the knuckle wouldnt be in the gap between door and frame. that would lokk a bit odd too.
     

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