question about fitting butt hinges

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by HIGHCROFT, Jan 2, 2007.

  1. goldenboy

    goldenboy Super Member

    Also I dont often agree with Handyandy however he is right to say that the hinge side with the most knuckles goes on the frame
     
  2. starlight tiles

    starlight tiles New Member

    yorkshireboy make your mind up son.firstly you were time served for 20 years and now it's 40 years.who's kiddin who,you or the hinges.lol
     
  3. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds New Member

    hinges should be sunk into the lining and into the door, read any carpetry book written in the last 150-200 years

    ANYBODY who does (or did) any different ISNT a carpenter

    bodgers, cowboys and farm labourers are what come to mind
     
  4. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    hinges should be sunk into the lining and into the
    door, read any carpetry book written in the last
    150-200 years

    ANYBODY who does (or did) any different ISNT a
    carpenter

    bodgers, cowboys and farm labourers are what come to
    mind

    As I related in my previous post,there are countless doors with hinges chopped only into the stile,who fitted them? I only took offence at people implying I was the only one to not house into the casing when anyone can see that this practice was commonplace.
    Read an old carpentry book and you won,t find advice on door fitting,this would be the work of the joiner
     
  5. Mof

    Mof Guest

    Dirty deeds, Look at some doors before you talk, I see about 80% of doors with thin steel hinges that are just set into the stile.If you want to set all hinges into the frame as well, go ahead waste your time.I myself just let them into the stile.If I am fitting nice brass hinges of good quality I let them into the frame as well.
     
  6. ivor bigun

    ivor bigun New Member

    I screw the hinges to the face of the door and the face of the frame. Sod all that chopping in. Cut the architave round the hinges.


    Works for me. Loads quicker!
     
  7. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    If you just bash the frame with a hammer a few times where the hinges go, when you screw the hinge on, it looks like they've been cut in. :)




    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  8. joesoap

    joesoap New Member

    Yeah! Right ! Spot on but why waste good money on screws when a few used nails will do the job and add a bit of character and class to the job. Joiners , Huh! who needs em ??? Cheers
     
  9. Mr Mike

    Mr Mike New Member

    .....so you lot, mitre or scribe internals on skirting ?

    ....JOKE ! PLEASE DON'T ANSWER THAT !!!!! :'(
     
  10. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds New Member

    mof and yorkshireboy, what a storm of ranting and abuse "methinks you ladies doth protest too much"

    i said two things

    "the correct way"

    "any other way looks like bodgers, cowboys and farm labourers
     
  11. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds New Member

    mof i would sling you off the site and send you a bill for replacing the doors
     
  12. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds New Member

    yorkshireboy

    books for apprentice carpenters dated from 1880, 1896, 1903 and 1947 all explain how install hinges
     
  13. ivor bigun

    ivor bigun New Member

    Yeah! Right ! Spot on but why waste good money on
    screws when a few used nails will do the job and add
    a bit of character and class to the job. Joiners ,
    Huh! who needs em ??? Cheers

    To be honest I do nail em, but I didn't want you all thinking I was some sort of rough ****..........
     
  14. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds New Member

    ivor i dont argue with quality tradesmen like yourself who butt nails in
     
  15. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    yorkshireboy

    books for apprentice carpenters dated from 1880,
    1896, 1903 and 1947 all explain how install hinges

    dd Are you a chippy or a librarian...;)
    Seriously though do you have an 1880 carpenters textbook must be an interesting read.What is the content I always thought that carpentry was the first fixing in them days and the joinery was the fine work,doors,panelling etc.
    I may be wrong and unlike many others do not mind admitting it
     
  16. Jonny Round Boy

    Jonny Round Boy New Member

    I've wondered about this for quite some time, but never got round to asking the question on here.

    I have seen doors hung both ways, and can see advantages and disadvantages in both. Personally, on interior doors with thin steel hinges I will cut only into the door, and simply screw the hinge onto the frame. Maybe this is a throwback to my 'furniture' days, as this is generally the way it's done on furniture (I'm trained as a cabinet maker, not a joiner).

    Or maybe it's just a Yorkshire thing ;)
     
  17. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds New Member

    i happen to be interested in the history of carpentry and old techniques, i do a lot of fix and repair work so it helps me day to day as well

    carpentry is on site work, joinery is a factory job. at the end of an apprentiship a guy would choose the branch of the profession (that was in the days when all builders had a joinery shop)

    joinery has traditionally always been lower paid but all year round work, carpentry higher paid but seasonal
     
  18. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds New Member

    better put the caveats back in, things have changed, builders no longer have dedicated joinery shops
     
  19. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds New Member

    jonny round boy, i cant comment on cabinet making

    what i was taught was that installing butt hinges in furniture is very slightly different to doors. letting half into the stile and half into the jamb doesnt change

    however in a cabinet the hinge should be set back further than a door such that only half the knuckle is visible
     
  20. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    Maybe it is just us Yorkshre lads Jonny but we haven,t heard back from Malcolm of Yorkshire who has never seen a door fitted like that in 40 years ???
    In furniture work there is plenty of depth for screws in the doors but if the door was fitted to a thin board there would not be much purchase for the screws,housing the hinges would make even less especially with a thick hinge.
    My old man has a 200 year old oak bureau and I,l check the hinges next time I see him
    I,m also interested in the history of our trade dd and collect old books but they are packed away as I am moving.
    I once pulled off an architrave in an 1870 house and the man who fitted it had signed his name on the back,not just scrawled but in beautifull old handwriting.It made me stop and think that,that long dead lad had wrote that 130 years ago and I was the first to see it.
    Has anyone else uncovered anything interesting ?
     

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