removing a radiator

Discussion in 'Plumbers' Talk' started by ejenner, Jul 2, 2021.

  1. ejenner

    ejenner Member

    Plumbing isn't top of my skills list but I have a radiator I'd like to remove as the room has underfloor heating and the radiator is always turned off.

    This radiator appears to be on the end of a circuit as the inlet and outlet come from the same side. i.e. it comes into the left side of the radiator and the pipe on the right side does a u-turn under the radiator and goes back to where the inlet pipe comes from.

    My main concern of course is the water coming out and what I should do to prevent a flood. The rest of it like cutting pipes and physically removing the radiator should be pretty straight forward.

    Can I cut the pipes and catch the water in a bucket or is it going to drain a house full of radiators into my kitchen? What's the usual process for doing this safely.
     
  2. terrymac

    terrymac Screwfix Select

    You would drain the system from the lowest point. If the pipework that you intend to cut into is on the first floor level,
    Then draining from the ground floor would suffice.
    Is your system sealed / pressurised or fed from a small tank in the loft ?
    Are you certain that the two pipes going to the rad in question are joined together below the floorboards ???
     
  3. ejenner

    ejenner Member

    it's a concrete floor with the pipes above ground. So you're saying the whole system has to be drained?

    That's fine but is it easy to fill it back up? I can turn off the water main while I'm draining it. All I have to do is turn the water back on to refill the system or is it more complicated than that?
     
  4. terrymac

    terrymac Screwfix Select

    Unless you answer the questions I asked,we have no idea what type of system you have . That makes it rather difficult to answer your questions about how to refill the system.
     
    Tilt likes this.
  5. ejenner

    ejenner Member

    All I can tell you which may be useful is that it's a conventional boiler rather than combi. I dunno if that draws a line at all. I know my previous system which was a combi boiler had no tank.
     
  6. terrymac

    terrymac Screwfix Select

    Probably best to engage a plumber to do the work for you.
     
  7. exbg

    exbg Active Member

    As per TerryM, you have probably misidentified the pipe route. get back under the boards and have a VERY good look.
    her is a slight/slim possibility that you have a one pipe system, but your description is not quite correct, although that may just be terminology of the inexperienced.

    And pictures speak a thousand words as Tel sang.
     
  8. ejenner

    ejenner Member

    It's a bit pointless posting on here sometimes. I said it's a concrete floor and the pipes are above ground. You can see them, no going under floorboards.

    For what it's worth, the entire purpose of asking questions like this is to hope to acquire the knowledge to complete the job more successfully. If the answer to every question is go and hire a plumber then what's the point? I can do pretty much anything DIY wise.
     
  9. exbg

    exbg Active Member

    For what it’s worth, if an enquirer does not provide requested information, they are not likely to get the help. Your description does not sound correct, you can’t be bothered to send photos and you did not respond to another guys question. So maybe a forum is not the place for you. Personally, your attitude to me having not read a later post stinks

    So perhaps you should just fumble through yourself, as you can , apparently, do pretty much anything..

    Or get a plumber
     
  10. pppmacca43

    pppmacca43 Super Member

    You will need to drain the heating system to do the work. If there is no drain off to do this, u could turn off the radiator valves, drain the radiator u want to remove and then drain the system through the valves.
    You need to work out whether your heating is filled via a tank(small tank most likely in loft) or if it’s pressurised via a filling loop. If it’s tank fed u will need to turn off the tank or tie the ballvalve up or the water will never stop. If pressurised go ahead and drain down. To fill once work is done u need to either open up tank again or pressurise via filling loop.
     
  11. ejenner

    ejenner Member

    Cheers. I'm pretty sure it's going to be a tank. I can see an overflow pipe high up on the side of the house and I don't see a filling loop near the boiler like I'd expect. I can turn off the water and allow the tank and radiators to drain can't I?

    I think this is the last radiator on the circuit and I believe it has a tail on it to attach a hose pipe.
     
    pppmacca43 likes this.
  12. pppmacca43

    pppmacca43 Super Member

    Yes if u turn off the water it will stop the tank filling
     
  13. DIYDave.

    DIYDave. Screwfix Select

    Don’t forget to add fresh inhibitor back to system when you refill, have it to hand before you start the work
     
  14. ejenner

    ejenner Member

    What's the inhibitor for? We're a soft water area and don't get any limescale. Or is it for something else?
     
  15. ejenner

    ejenner Member

    Just looked it up. Probably worth putting in either way...
     
  16. Starslikedust

    Starslikedust Member

    It prevents the iron in the system (radiators) from rusting.
     

Share This Page