Replacing plasterboard and boarding to existing skim coat and joints

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by Dark_KnightUK, Aug 14, 2021.

  1. Dark_KnightUK

    Dark_KnightUK New Member

    Hey Everyone,

    So I have skimmed plasterboard before and can do that pretty well.

    But I had a partition put up and that was boarded and skimmed. I have had to rip a section out this weekend as I wanted to lay some pipework into the wall.

    As you can see from the attached picture I just ripped off pretty much the whole plasterboard piece, so I could work cleanly.

    There is also the channel going up I am going to need to patch back as well.

    Now my questions are:

    I can screw in the new 12mm board but obviously, the current skim coat means the joints arent, and I won't be able to just tape it. Now from what I have read in these posts:

    https://community.screwfix.com/threads/plasterboard-join-to-existing-wall-scrim-tape.139449/
    https://community.screwfix.com/threads/plaster-to-plaster.13574/

    So I can trim the current skim coat down to the plasterboard around the joint, then tape using some scrim tape as the boards will be levels, pva the joint and then skim up to it and I should be good?

    I did read that instead of doing that I could use some quality filler, to fill the joining gap and create a bit of a slope to the current skim coat and then skim the board and its be level, but I am not sure about that imo.

    For the channel, I am going to straighten it out first and then I could do a similar kind of thing as above, or so what all the videos online show and get a section of plasterboard in behind it and use some wood to screw it in place and then using some kind of bonding to get it about 2-3mm from the current skim depth and then skim over it

    Then I have seen this video:


    What they do is they put some cardboard shims in to bring the plasterboard level pretty much with the current plaster around it? Do you still have the issue of the joins? Would you tape over both and then skim over the whole wall to hide the tape and make it level, or what they fill in the gap and then just skim that section? Or is that whole video a bad idea?

    I appreciate any advice you can give!

    Cheers!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. McSport

    McSport Active Member

    DIYer and not very good at plastering !

    Similar Job.
    I used packers to bring the replacement Board to the same level as the existing board
    Used Jointing compound (Easifill) and Paper Tape.
    Bought some decent Stainless 6 and 8 Inch Knives.

    Turned out very well and pretty much invisible.
     
  3. Dark_KnightUK

    Dark_KnightUK New Member

    Just want to understand the process you used:

    So you used packers to bring the board up level with the current skimmed plasterboard, filled in the joints and used paper tape instead of mesh tape?

    Do you skim the new plasterboard and now it looks pretty much invisible?
     
  4. McSport

    McSport Active Member

    Have a look on Youtube for Jointing and Taping.
    A lot is from the US

    Jointing compound onto the joint.
    Set the Paper Tape into it.
    Add more Compound onto the Paper Tape and feather out.
    Wait for it to set. Sand. Add more compound. Set. Sand.
    Repeat if necessary. Took me 3 or 4 applications.

    No skimming. You are effectively hiding the joint by spreading it wide.
    I am not very good at plastering. Happy with the result.

    Have since discovered Fibatape in place of Paper Tape
     
  5. CGN

    CGN Screwfix Select

    Scrim, bond and skim the whole wall out
     
  6. Dark_KnightUK

    Dark_KnightUK New Member

    cheers for the clarification!
     
  7. Dark_KnightUK

    Dark_KnightUK New Member

    yeah that is an option, I could easily mix enough multi finish to just do the whole wall again
     

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