Rising Damp issue- Help!

Discussion in 'Other Trades Talk' started by Eva0000, Dec 30, 2019.

  1. Eva0000

    Eva0000 New Member

    Hi, just moved into a ground floor flat and there is huge condensation in one of the spare rooms which has 3 external walls. There is rising damp from one corner - possibly triggered by leaving clothes to dry in the room - and the carpet in that corner is starting to stain and the floor underneath very wet.. I have lifted it up to try to dry it but any suggestions on what to do further or if this is a more serious problem? Could an air circulation system in the wall help to solve this possibly? Each morning the windows are totally condensed - there is someone staying in the room but it makes no difference if they sleep with door open or closed as the moisture levels remain the same..
     
  2. Severntrent

    Severntrent Active Member

    Need to sleep with window open.
     
  3. Eva0000

    Eva0000 New Member

    Ground floor flat - not that safe!
     
  4. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member


    In that case, buy a dehumidifier, rising damp and condensation are two different things. If it’s that damp in there then it’s not going to dry out instantly, keep the window open when someone’s home, stop drying clothes on the radiator, and remember to empty the dehumidifier regularly.
     
  5. Severntrent

    Severntrent Active Member

    So any water vapour produced by drying clothes/cooking/people circulates around the flat looking for something cold to condense on. You need to open your windows as best you can when it is safe to do so otherwise some sort of mechanical ventilation system required but I assume its not your flat?
     
  6. Eva0000

    Eva0000 New Member

    Thank you so much all that is making me less nervous that it is something more serious.. lifting the carpet it smelt of damp but no mould smells so far so letting it dry out as much as possible..
     
  7. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Well-Known Member

    three external walls and drying clothes in the room. Says it all - where do you think the water from the clothes goes to? it can't just vanish - it has to go somewhere!
     
    SteveMJ likes this.
  8. Eva0000

    Eva0000 New Member

    Yes Mr Rusty and the window has been kept open a few hours a day most days daytime when people are in. Thank you for the helpful input.
     
  9. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Well-Known Member

    Sorry, didn't mean to be flippant. We see so many "rising damp" threads on here which are usually anything but. The truth is living in warm houses means the air can hold a lot of moisture. Wherever there are cold spots, like on the lowest part of external walls, in external corners etc. the wall temperature is low enough to be below the dew point. The solution is reduce humidity, reduce temperature, ventilate and/or/if you can add insulation to increase the surface temperature. However, the fact that your windows are totally condensed points directly at too-high humidity. This may well be coming from very damp walls which will take a while to dry out. Perhaps shut the room down but get some heat in to it, ventilate, put a dehumidifier in and try and get it dry.
     
    KIAB likes this.
  10. Eva0000

    Eva0000 New Member

    Thank you will have a go at this this week :)
     
  11. SteveMJ

    SteveMJ Active Member

    Eva, you said "There is rising damp from one corner - possibly triggered by leaving clothes to dry in the room". That is a contradiction, moisture from the clothes will go somewhere; probably condensing on your walls, windows etc.

    Rising damp is from moisture in the soil rising through the building's structure. This is usually stopped by a damp course; an impervious layer low in the structure. This layer can be breached by damage to it or external items (i.e. soil) that covers it and allows moisture to bypass it.

    I hope that helps, Stephen
     
  12. martinwinlow

    martinwinlow New Member

    First thing I'd be asking is 'what's on the other side of the wall in that damp corner'. The cause of the damp could be a leaking gutter or downpipe not draining water away properly allowing rainwater to pool against that bit of the outside of the building. Or it could be an internal leak next door (if the corner is on the party wall). Can you get out there and have a look and/or ask the neighbour?

    On a related note, here's a significant amount of talk 'on the web' suggesting there is no such thing as 'rising damp' - this article is one of the 'better' ones... https://www.heritage-house.org/damp-and-condensation/managing-damp-in-old-buildings.html
     
  13. Eva0000

    Eva0000 New Member

    Thank you all - new to the uk and not having lived in a ground floor floor (high rises overseas) first time finding something like this. On the external wall it is clear and surrounded by about 30cms of concrete - admittedly corner bricks slightly darker but this could be a coincidence. The wall is clear and not connected - the room sticks out like a U shape from the rest of the construction. Really appreciate the suggestions and help - windows are pretty much open daytime now as I am home and no new mould on walls but under the carpet was very wet so drying this out currently..
     
  14. martinwinlow

    martinwinlow New Member

    There has got to be a reason why you are getting damp in this one spot and nowhere else. Either that corner is significantly colder than the rest of the surfaces in the room for some reason) and that's why what water vapour is in the air is condensing there and making it damp OR there is water coming from outside the room - through the wall or from the floor. The latter scenario is almost certainly either a water leak from next door or outside (if the damp corner is adjacent to the neighbour - it's not clear (to me, anyway) if this is the case or not from your description) or rainwater-based. A photo from outside showing where the damp is on the inside is might help.

    You can buy paper testing strips to detect the presence of chlorine to figure out if the damp is mains-water-related or not (mains water has a fair amount of chlorine present - normally between 0.2 and 0.5 milligrammes/litre. But this won't help if you haven't any actual fluid to test... maybe you do. A humidity meter would also help discover if the amount of water vapour in the air is enough to be causing the damp by condensation. Of course, if you do have high humidity, it may just be the water leaking into your room structure that is causing it! Both are cheap and readily available (I'd suggest ebay).

    One other thing... you could try putting a small (say 600mm square) piece of plastic sheet between the corner of carpet and the floor beneath (I'm assuming that the floor is concrete???) and put the carpet down on top to keep the plastic sheet flat to the floor). Leave it for a few days and then lift it to see if the *bottom* of the plastic is wet. If not, then it would seem reasonable to assume the damp is not coming from the floor below... or if it *is* wet, then it's most likely the water is coming from the floor and that it's not likely to be due to condensation in the air. In the latter case, the top of the plastic sheet should be wet.

    It's all more art than science!
     
    Mr Rusty likes this.
  15. Eva0000

    Eva0000 New Member

    Martin you are a genius thank you! Will try to take some pics this week and attach here but the above is super useful!
     

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