Salamander pump instalation HELP !!

Discussion in 'Plumbers' Talk' started by Scott Ronson, Mar 12, 2019.

  1. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member

    It is just that easy ... although feed goes into tank one, and take-offs from tank two. Otherwise you will get stale water. Or just get a larger single tank. Polytank are a very good brand and supply a full fitting kit - SF stock some of their range which is very comprehensive from 12 gallon to 100 gallon. http://polytank.co.uk/polytank.html
     
  2. Scott Ronson

    Scott Ronson New Member


    Is that not what this is ? I've got an extra pipe out of the back at the top of the cylinder

    is that not what this is though ?
     

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  3. xednim

    xednim Active Member

    what it should be: loop from the boiler goes to the cylinder where you have coiled pipe which heats up water inside of the storage cylinder, storage cylinder should have water supply at the bottom and feed your HWS from the top, inlet pipe from the boiler has 3way walve that re-direct the water to the heating system
     
  4. Scott Ronson

    Scott Ronson New Member

    thank you , I have all that how you explained but at the back I have the cold water supply at the bottom then about 3/4 the way up the cylinder I have an extra pipe that is hot , that comes out the cylinder then down under the floor , then the outlet on the very top , at the front i have the boiler pipes ? I cant find any diagrams that have this extra pipe or what its for , its obviously supplying hot water to somewhere I guess
     
  5. xednim

    xednim Active Member

    do you have T connector on the top outlet pipe? this pipe that you have mentioned can feed your taps- is any valve on it that you can isolate ind check your water outlets?
    one pipe is returning pipe to the water tank upstairs should be on T connector above the boiler
     
  6. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member

    To prove that it is te hot outlet, you can turn the heating off, then run a hot shower with someone holding that pipe. After a while does it go cold? If so, then that is the shower feed and the hot is exhausted. If only 3/4 of the way up then you are not using the water at the very top which could be useful if two showeres are needed in succession, do looking at a top flange may be an option.
     
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  7. Scott Ronson

    Scott Ronson New Member

    top outlet is just an elbow then to a T that goes up to the loft and down under the floor , it has got an isolation valve on this extra pipe but it won't turn and worried that if I mess with it before i actually start doing any work with the pump it may leak , if this is maybe feeding the hot for shower and upstairs taps would i then be able to cap that off from the cylinder , replace the top elbow with an S flange for the hot water feed to the pump and then out of the pump into this extra pipe if it is feeding the upstairs ?
     
  8. Scott Ronson

    Scott Ronson New Member


    I did exactly this , run hot tap in all 3 bathrooms and turn shower mixers round to max so at its hottest , once the showers where running cold that pipe was also cold , the hot taps where still running hot , so do you think I can safely say that pipe is purely running the hot to the showers ? , so I can do what I suggested above , cap that pipe off at the cylinder , then use the remaining pipe as the outlet to the showers for my pumped hot water ?
     
  9. ecoplumbing

    ecoplumbing Active Member

    Can't really tell from that angle but turn the gatevalve off and see if it stops the flow to the shower
     
  10. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member

    You must ensure you use a flange for the pump. The pipe to the attic is a vent and must remain. You need to understand what the top pipe does too, it may be taps only and that would be fine to leave there as you don't really want pumped hot water to frequently used taps. Try and free the valve before you do anything else, try turning both ways.
     
  11. Scott Ronson

    Scott Ronson New Member


    yeah I will definitely be using an S flange at the top , I ran the hot tap in each bathroom and the shower on hottest all at same time , when the showers went cold that extra pipe when cold as well but the taps where still all running hot, In the past to I have fitted a downstairs toilet and utility , when I done this I turned to gate off on the top pipe and the cold water feed pipe and that also stopped all the hot and cold water running to the taps throughout the house, on another note if I go ahead with the installation can I use fast fit pipe and connectors for it all or should I stay with copper ? I just thought it may limit the usage of elbow joins as 2 of the pipes would need to be angled to keep them out of the way of the middle of the airing cupboard ?
     
  12. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member

    You will start a good debate about plastic v copper !

    I say, choose a decent brand of plastic Hep2O or Speedfit - the pump may already have push fit and it will make everything a lot easier.
     
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  13. Heat

    Heat Well-Known Member

    Copper much better, but you will need a plumber to do it.
    It really isn’t arguable.

    Plastic pipes are usually pathetic to have connected to and from the pump. Elbows should not be used.
    Hoses from pumps should be kept straight - usually vertical. Their purpose is not to be bent, but to be unaffected by vibration of pump and also to not transmit the pump vibration to pipes.
    So you offset copper pipes to the pump hoses.

    Copper can have nice offsets to the pump and all vertical and horizontal pipes at wall clipped.
    Remember if a push fit joint comes off, the pump will start and put out gallons of high pressure water in minutes, so the only push fit I use is those as part of the pump
     

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