Sealing a Leaking cold " mains " internal water pipe ??

Discussion in 'Plumbers' Talk' started by circuitbender, Sep 10, 2019.

  1. circuitbender

    circuitbender New Member

    Hi everyone ,
    I noticed a small damp patch on plaster about 6 inches above floor in the utility, thought it might be a bit of rising damp, but now, i'm pretty certain its a leak from the cold 15mm pipe that runs around the utility.
    there is a slow drip, drip, drip, that i can hear when i listen carefully when its quiet, esp when i put my ear to the plasterboard. I have just turned fully off the internal stop tap on the mains and the dripping stops.
    So my question is... and i hope there is ? ... a miracle product ( additive ) that can ( somehow ) be added into the cold water mains ( after the internal stop tap has isolated the mains water ) that will FIND the leak and seal it rather like the additive for lower pressure water systems . ? I know its a long shot but it would certainly avoid me having to find the leaky copper fitting. If there is such a miracle product, I can even imagine how to introduce it into the cold water pipes ?
    If all else fails, it will of course be finding where the leak is and fixing it.
    Thanks in anticipation of any ideas
     
  2. terrymac

    terrymac Well-Known Member

    There is no such thing. There is luckily enough a human solution called a plumber.
     
    KIAB and Heat like this.
  3. Heat

    Heat Well-Known Member

    Your leak could be caused by a partly rotted pipe or a bad soldered joint or a weeping brass compression joint or push fit joint not correctly done, O ring damaged.
    Only way to fix any leak properly is to replace the pipe/fitting
     
    KIAB likes this.
  4. circuitbender

    circuitbender New Member

    Thought so .
    That will be me then ! as I did the 2nd fix plumbing some 15 years ago . At least I can remember the pipe runs lol.
    When I start to investigate, I’ll update in case I can help anyone in this situation.
     
  5. Heat

    Heat Well-Known Member

    You shouldn’t have leaks on pipework, even if it is decades old, unless you have copper plumbing in an area the water causes corrosion
     
    KIAB likes this.
  6. just pumps

    just pumps Active Member

    Better find it incase it gets worse in a sudden and big manner ;)
     
    Heat and KIAB like this.
  7. circuitbender

    circuitbender New Member

    I’ve found the leak thank goodness
    It’s strange because it seems to be as if there’s a perforation in the 15mm copper where the leak is, in other words, it hasn’t been perforated with a nail or screw etc. When I put the pipes in I used saddles to pin them to the building blocks over poly dpc. Problem now is there’s no flexibility with the pipe to make good the repair with a compression joint . I have about 12 inches of a horizontal run behind a toilet bowl to contend with so another question, any ideas pls on a repair of this type, considering the lack of flexibility of the copper run as it is at present, one idea ( don’t laugh )was a flexy coupler to patch across the leak.
    So again, I was wondering if you guys can kindly suggest an idea for a repair of this type. The building block are the very soft ones so I can easily pick away enough to get a compression coupler in, but it’s the lack of flexibility that’s the issue. Regards
     
  8. terrymac

    terrymac Well-Known Member

    You can solder a patch over the copper pipe if its a pin hole ,and the hole is at the front of the pipe ( I.e. you can see it in front of you)
    However ,if it is a pin hole leak that had corroded from inside the pipe to outside ,you may well have a more deep rooted problem with pitting. Which involves all sections of the copper pipe being replaced.
     
    Heat, The Teach and just pumps like this.
  9. DIYDave.

    DIYDave. Well-Known Member

    15mm brass compression slip coupling
     
  10. nigel willson

    nigel willson Well-Known Member

    Normal 15 mm compression coupler with3 the centre stop filed out= slip coupler
     
    Tony Goddard likes this.
  11. circuitbender

    circuitbender New Member

    Thanks everyone for the replies
    I picked up a slip compression coupler yesterday and ready to tighten up,
    In the past, I’ve always used ptfe tape on the thread, but the chap at the shop said I won’t need it.?
    The pipe is 15 yrs old and I’ve cleaned it up, no burrs and brightened it up with fine wire wool so I’m ready to tighten up.
    I would appreciate any thoughts on whether to wrap a few turns of ptfe tape on thread / olives ??
    Thanks
     
  12. DIYDave.

    DIYDave. Well-Known Member

    Or just buy one perhaps ?
     
    PhilSo likes this.
  13. just pumps

    just pumps Active Member

    The olive is the sealing point, the nut on the thread compresses the olive making the seal. On a new fitting PTFE should not be required anywhere.
     
    Heat likes this.
  14. Dam0n

    Dam0n Active Member

    Why don't you cut out a section and then solder a new repair piece in? Gotta be better than a compression fitting. Especially if it's buried behind a wall.
     
  15. circuitbender

    circuitbender New Member

    Thanks Just Pumps and everyone for the replies
    All tightened up and leak free.
    Because ive had to break away the plaster board from the batons I can keep an eye on it and let the wall dry out before the wall repair
    Very good those slip fit compression fittings.
     
  16. DIYDave.

    DIYDave. Well-Known Member

    [QUOTE="circuitbender, post: 1737228, member: 198558"


    Very good those slip fit compression fittings.[/QUOTE]


    Your welcome :)
     
  17. terrymac

    terrymac Well-Known Member

    Didn't bother to establish what caused the pipe to leak ,as it was not at a joint ?
    Asking for further grief !!
     
    just pumps likes this.

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