Sealing around window frames, in the olden days

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by Edales, Dec 19, 2008.

  1. Edales

    Edales New Member

    In the days prior to acrylic and silicone sealants, how did they seal the gap around window frames? Was putty applied and then painted, or mortar applied and then painted, or what? I'm just curious. Thanks.
     
  2. fred bear

    fred bear New Member

    mortar pointing
     
  3. bigjules

    bigjules New Member

    Had both mortar pointing and painted putty when we first moved in to our house, built 1949.
     
  4. sammy toaster

    sammy toaster New Member

    the "nib" or upstand on a concrete cill was bedded in mastic putty, the sides and head where left dry and there was never a problem.
     
  5. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    Why bother replying to a post if you don,t now the answer????
    I,ve never seen old windows sealed with mortar or putty or read about either practice.
    The frames were sealed using a finger trowel and trowel mastic,which is still available.
    In the old days this would be mixed on site by the painter from fine sand and linseed oil.
    As for Sammys mastic putty thats a new one on me.
     
  6. sammy toaster

    sammy toaster New Member

    tis a new one on you because you are a gobshite.
     
  7. bigjules

    bigjules New Member

    I,ve never seen old windows sealed with mortar or putty or read about either practice.

    As for Sammys mastic putty thats a new one on me.



    Just 'cos you've never seen it, doesn't mean that it doesn't exist.
    *

    [Edited by: admin6]
     
  8. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Why bother replying to a post if you don,t now the answer????
    I,ve never seen old windows sealed with mortar or putty or read about either practice.
    The frames were sealed using a finger trowel and trowel mastic,which is still available.
    In the old days this would be mixed on site by the painter from fine sand and linseed oil.
    As for Sammys mastic putty thats a new one on me.




    Yorkshireboy, why bother replying, if you don't know the answer yourself.

    shot yourself in the foot, my man.


    I have taken out MANY windows that were sealed with only a bead of mortar(as original). It was a particular pain, because it all had to be chipped off before removing the frame.



    Mr. Handyandy - really
     
  9. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    It has to be chipped out because it is old rock hard linseed oil mastic.
    Why would anyone point around a wooden window with mortar when the correct mastic is cheap and available.
    It may be bodged by someone at a later date but no old time tradesman would use anything but linseed oil and fine sand.This sets hard like a mortar over time which leads to many people assuming it is mortar.

    To answer the original question again..In the olden days windows were sealed with a linseed oil mastic,never with mortar.
     
  10. "I have taken out MANY windows that were sealed with only a bead of mortar(as original)."


    <u>Mortar does not adhere to wood!</u> it is definitely linseed oil mastic.
     
  11. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    I beg to differ old boy.

    This was 100% mortar. Hard yes. Mortar yes.


    Mr. Handyandy - really
     
  12. Then beg to differ with science, old boy.
     
  13. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    "Mortar does not adhere to wood! it is definitely linseed oil mastic."


    Probably the reason the frames failed to keep out the water.

    Other occasions there was just render up to the window.


    Not my fault. I just took it out, I didn't put it there.

    Mr. Handyandy - really
     
  14. Not my fault. I just took it out, I didn't put it there.


    Fair enuff
     
  15. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    And another thing. I suppose they use putty for timber frame houses, where bricks/blocks are built between the timbers eh ?


    Mr. Handyandy - really
     
  16. And another thing.


    The reveals of 'timber kits' are mostly brick, these are normally sealed with oil based mastic, by contractors like these.
     
  17. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    You,re getting confused Handy were not talking about putty which is linseed oil and chalk.
    Unless you worked in an area where all the old windows were sealed by people who wrongly used mortar,you are mistaken.
    If you are saying the old window frames were originally sealed with mortar it would be a lime mortar which does not go rock hard,it would have crumbled away long ago.
     
  18. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    It was a hard mortar, which sometimes fell away in strips of say, 3"(a bit like old putty will) but this was 100% mortar. When fallen(or taken away), there was no other sealant behind. More often than not, it was found on a 'soft' brick building.





    Mr. Handyandy - really
     
  19. ecm

    ecm New Member

    Not saying in your case it wasn't mortar Handy, but it should have been trowel mastic as that's what they used to use. Doubt they stock it in BandQ, but all decent merchants still stock it.
     
  20. Edales

    Edales New Member

    Thanks for the replies, this has been an interesting thread. I've never heard of trowel mastic before, but then I'm not in the trade - just a reluctant DIYer. I imagine the trowel mastic is a lot more satisfying to apply than the modern sealant using a cartridge gun.
     

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