smart switches

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by mrppp, Sep 14, 2018.

  1. mrppp

    mrppp Member

    I am looking at getting a smart switch, that requires a neutral wire at the box/fitting.

    My lights are wired as so, I have the feed going to the back box, the light fitting then has its feed from the backbox, so on a one gang fitting i have two cables, on a 2 way i have 3 cables, the feed and 2 cables to the lights.

    Trying to understand the smart switch diagram?
     

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  2. rogerk101

    rogerk101 Well-Known Member

    Your question is unclear, but the diagram is crystal clear.
    The smartswitch has a permanent Line (L) and Neutral (N), and then it has two switched outputs L1 and L2.
    If you want to switch only one item, then connect it to L1 and N, and don't connect anything to L2.
    If you want to use the smartswitch to turn on/off two different items independently, then connect one to L1 and N and the other to L2 and N.
     
  3. mrppp

    mrppp Member

    OK I understand that, but this is my wiring at the backbox. I have my main feed coming in so my first switch in house has a feed coming from consumer unit ( that then links on to other lights), The light fitting then has a twin and earth coming to the backbox, so i have one feed cable and one cable to light, they are both joined/connected to switch gang.
    So would my main feed live and light live join to L then earths all joined then the neutral from the main feed join with the neutral of light cable and go to L1?
     

    Attached Files:

  4. MGW

    MGW Well-Known Member

    There are two ways to wire lights.
    Daisy chain rose to rose.
    Daisy chain switch to switch.
    Both have plus and minus features, rose to rose has lower volt drop, line for emergency light or cooling fan, so in UK is preferred method. So there are light switches designed to run without a neutral the MiHome Energenie is one, and also loads of dimming switches. Our bulbs are designed so a small current can flow without causing bulb to glow dim or flash, and switches clearly have to be well designed to use a minimum amount of stand-by current.

    So the big question, why do you want to use a Smart switch not designed for UK wiring? Has it got some features ours don't have? I will admit there are some problems with most smart switches which you will not find out about until you buy them.

    The one I have has three built in timers, and can either work with a hub, or use a simple remote control, there is a maximum of three remote controls to each switch, and the hub is a bit expensive, however it also controls the central heating.

    It can use IFTTT and this is where it all gets a bit hazy, there are new apps every day, so light can be controlled by all sorts like a weather forecast, and geofencing, most of it I have never tried to use.
     
  5. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    Looks like that type of switch requires a neutral at the switch itself. You only have the usual live and switched live in yours so unless you are prepared to rewire the switch with a 3-core then you can't use it.
     
  6. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member

    According to the OPs diagram he has L & N at the switch and from there feed SwL & N to the light.
     
  7. mrppp

    mrppp Member

    Yes I have a neutral at switch so assume I can use this arrangement?
     
  8. mrppp

    mrppp Member

    I'm after light switches that work with Samsung Smartthings
     
  9. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    You wire the feed in and the feed out cables into the terminals on the smart switch marked L and N.
    The brown which goes to the light should be terminated in L1 or if you prefer in L2.
    The blue to the light should be terminated in the N terminal on the smart switch.
    You may find terminating 3 wires in the N terminal a pain, so may have to use a connector block for the 3 neutrals, with a 4th wire from the connector block to the N terminal.
     
    mrppp likes this.
  10. mrppp

    mrppp Member

    Thank you. I will use a few Wagos to help.
     
  11. MGW

    MGW Well-Known Member

    I don't know what a Samsung smart thing is? But I can program my MiHome light switch from my Samsung phone and tablet and turn it on/off. But it does need the hub to do that.
     
  12. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    Your lights connect to your hub via WiFi, which is connected to the internet.
    Your phone connects to your Hub via WiFi then sends instructions via the internet to your Hub and on to your lights.
    If you were to disconnect your hub from the internet, your phone would not be able to talk to your lights, even though both your phone and your lights are connected to the Hub.
     
  13. MGW

    MGW Well-Known Member

    Yes that is what MiHome does, just tested and yes no internet and PC will not turn light on/off that is leaving router powered just unplugging phone line.

    Are you saying with Samsung Smart thing it will work without internet being live?
     
  14. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    From what I understand, all these ‘smart home’ systems use the internet.
    None of them will work if there is no internet connection.
    Though it may be possible to access the device’s Home page via the IP address, and control things from there?
     
  15. MGW

    MGW Well-Known Member

    There is no reason why a wifi switch should need internet, however it would need a phone, tablet, or PC program which assessed it through wifi and local LAN only. To assess world wide, it would need internet, and likely easier to always use internet with no local bypass.

    It seems "Smart" means it will connect to phone, and has nothing to do with any artificial intelligence.

    However the MiHome switch may not work from PC without internet, but it will work with a remote control, I have a IP camera, that will work local with a phone or tablet, but needs internet with PC. The problem is there is nothing in the adverts to tell which is which.
     

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