Sound and thermal insulation quandaries

Discussion in 'Eco Talk' started by Victoria Boome, Nov 15, 2018.

  1. Victoria Boome

    Victoria Boome New Member

    complete novice here, apart from things I’ve read / learnt online...

    This year we moved into a bungalow with bedrooms built upstairs (built this way, not converted) and a small (tiny, you have to lay flat) loft space. House was built in the 80’s. It is freezing cold once the heating goes off and retains little heat. Upstairs and downstairs are the same. We have new central heating but it seems like a waste if we can’t retain the heat!

    We had the cavity wall checked by companies who do it free etc and whatever type we have in the walls can’t be topped up? Does this sound right?

    The house is on a hill so we know there’s a cavity under the floors which probably adds to the cold. It’s unlikely we can afford to do anything about that.

    Upstairs all of the rooms have big pitches. Companies who do free loft insulation have said we should install kingspan sheets on top of the pitches and that they don’t insulate from inside the loft into pitches anymore. Opinions on if this would help / is worth losing some head height?

    My husband laid some installation in the loft and boarded over it. Doesn’t seem to have made a difference upstairs.

    The sound transfer between rooms is terrible! I’ve done a lot of reading into adding acoustic rockwool to the bedroom floor to reduce conversation and tv noise from the room below (we can hear tv and talking word for word). Question - what floor boards should we lay over the rock wool and should we drill the floor boards into the joists or is there another way? Where do we add the acoustic sealant?

    Downstairs we have an internal wall between the living room and dining room, both of which are now living rooms. We can hear the tv and conversations word for word in each room. will acoustic rockwool and acoustic plasterboard help? How should we attach the acoustic plasterboard to the joists? Should we invest in a solid wood door? Again, where do we use the acoustic sealant? The noise transfer in the house is driving me mad - I can’t find a room to have any quiet or peace in!

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. DIY womble

    DIY womble Well-Known Member

    Heat likes this.
  3. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Well-Known Member

    I do not think that is what the lady had in mind :)
     
    Heat likes this.
  4. DIY womble

    DIY womble Well-Known Member

    Hi hope you like my sense of humour
    Not really any short cuts to your situation , the builder I plaster and dry line for buys your type of property and he doesn't mess around , most of them are partly gutted for insulation and layout improvement ,
    If your happy with the internal then you could consider external insulation and render
    Internally , I've just done a couple of teenage boys rooms either side of parents as an overskim , boards were cut not smashed off and used as stud cavity sound insulation along with rockwool so only the adjoining two walls had new boards . the sloping roof is sometimes easier to remove the tiles and insulate from the outside
     
  5. DIY womble

    DIY womble Well-Known Member

    Hi hope you like my sense of humour
    Not really any short cuts to your situation , the builder I plaster and dry line for buys your type of property and he doesn't mess around , most of them are partly gutted for insulation and layout improvement ,
    If your happy with the internal then you could consider external insulation and render
    Internally , I've just done a couple of teenage boys rooms either side of parents as an overskim , boards were cut not smashed off and used as stud cavity sound insulation along with rockwool so only the adjoining two walls had new boards . the sloping roof is sometimes easier to remove the tiles and insulate from the outside
     

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