Staining a kitchen worktop to make it darker

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by PTeddy, Mar 12, 2007.

  1. PTeddy

    PTeddy New Member

    I want a dark worktop, but the darker woods are quite expensive.

    I was looking at buying beech / oak kitchen worktops, but they're very light in colour. can they be darkened by applying oil, or possibly staining them?

    If staining is an option, can they still be oiled to protect them after as stain has been applied?

    Thanks
     
  2. Tinderstick

    Tinderstick New Member

    Ugh, now, I'm not really sure thats a good idea!

    I lived in a place where light floorboards had been stained a dark colour. Looked great to start with but after a few months it had light stripes in it due to inevitable scratching - and that was 'Diamond Hard' varnished!

    Worktops with oiled finish would suffer as much, perhaps worse, in my opinion.

    That aside, it should be no problem oiling wood after staining - indeed, it is a good idea as it prolongs the life of the wood and its finish.

    What about stone... if you want a dark finish?
     
  3. jasonb

    jasonb New Member

    Beech does not take a stain well

    Oak can be darkened with a solution of vandyke crystals to look like walnut or even wenge if you mix it strong enough. It can then be oiled in the normal way.

    Alternatively mix a spirit based stain in with your oil as it makes it easier to apply but willl not be as dark.

    Jason
     
  4. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Beech does not take a stain well

    Oak can be darkened with a solution of vandyke
    crystals to look like walnut or even wenge if you mix
    it strong enough. It can then be oiled in the normal
    way.

    Alternatively mix a spirit based stain in with your
    oil as it makes it easier to apply but willl not be
    as dark.

    Jason



    But check for food safety.


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  5. jasonb

    jasonb New Member

    Vandyke crystals are made from crushed walnut shells so should not be a problem.

    The majority of oils used on worktops are not food safe but if you are actually cutting on or eating off a wooden worktop you should be considering laminate!!

    Jason
     
  6. > I want a dark worktop, but the darker woods are quite
    expensive.



    put your hand deeper into your pocket and buy the real thing
     
  7. PTeddy

    PTeddy New Member

    Thanks for the advice. I'll give it a try.
     
  8. tattrat

    tattrat New Member

    You could go for carbonised bamboo, it is quite dark already and very water resistant.
     

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