Stair Treads

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Gummo, Oct 10, 2018.

  1. Gummo

    Gummo Member

    I want to fit new hardwood treads on top of my 90 year-old, knackered pine treads.

    Any recommendations as to the most reasonable place to buy on-line?
     
  2. AlvyChippy

    AlvyChippy Active Member

    Not what you asking for, but heads up, you'll have to trim old bull nose off and consider new one to form (either in thickness and overhang or else)
     
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  3. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    New staircase easier option.:)
     
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  4. goldenboy

    goldenboy Well-Known Member

    You need a good machinist to run you out some thin hardwood.

    Will be expensive as there is a lot of waste machining wide thin stock unless someone has a very big capacity bandsaw.
     
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  5. goldenboy

    goldenboy Well-Known Member

    I was talking to a mate who not long after having bought a new build had his stairs "laminated"

    what the geezer did sounded like it had severely structurally weakened the staircase construction.
     
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  6. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    If treads are worn, just not worth the hassle.
     
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  7. AlvyChippy

    AlvyChippy Active Member

    yes and no...
    Lets say, to cut the bull nose with "buzz saw", glue on 12mm scribed planks flush and glue/pin on 1"x3/4" bull nose... I'd say worth a risk (budget+ skills vs realistic proper replacement cost) as old staircases used to have 3/4" thick raisers ;)
     
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  8. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member


    Show a couple of pictures of your "knackered treads" and let's see what's possible. What type of hardwood were you hoping for?
     
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  9. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Well-Known Member

    If you are good enough with wood to make an acceptable job of over-boarding treads, then you are good enough to take the staircase apart and fit new treads. If the stringers are OK and you can get to the underside, it is possible. Personally, I wouldn't attempt to plant on new treads and nosings - nosings particularly take lots of bashing as peeps use the stairs
     
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  10. Gummo

    Gummo Member

    The mind's blown with your divergent thoughts.

    This is what set me off on my particular path:

     
  11. Gummo

    Gummo Member

  12. Gummo

    Gummo Member

    Done

    Not fussy on type, so the cheapest would do.
     
  13. Richard_

    Richard_ Active Member

  14. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member

    I would spend a fair bit of time with a very sharp Harris paint scraper, random orbital sander and either a delta sander or multitool with sanding attachments and see what one tread comes out like. As it stands your stairs doesn't look particularly attractive due to the three unattractive tones standing out against each other.
     
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  15. Gummo

    Gummo Member

    The ridging of the aged grain on the treads would demand too heavy a sanding.

    That's why I want to cover them; ideally, they'll end up the same shade as the balustrade which is more recent.
     
  16. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member

    Use the scraper on the tread for 90%, sander the other 10%. Just try it on one, see what it comes out like and then test a finish on a small area to see if it works, you may be pleasantly surprised. I've scraped two knackered original handrails to test before the people made the decision to replace the lot, in both cases they liked what was underneath and ended up keeping the original full balustrade, though I lost the work I was secretly pleased as I'm a traditionalist at heart. If it looks cack you can then go back to your original plan.
     
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  17. RolandK

    RolandK Active Member

    I decided to clad my staircase a few years ago and decided to use a good quality laminate flooring. I cut the existing nosings flush with the risers and then clad the tread and riser and finished off with a hardwood nosing on each tread. The nosing is proud of the laminate and makes the treads more secure to use with no chance of slipping.

    20181012_183519.jpg 20181012_183546.jpg
     
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  18. Gummo

    Gummo Member

    What did you secure the nosing with and where did you get it?
     
  19. Gummo

    Gummo Member

    I did that - early optimism gave way to disappointment - back to plan A. Thanks.
     
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  20. RolandK

    RolandK Active Member

    I got the nosings from Fintrim. Solid oak stained to one of a number of colours. They are fixed with adhesive. Something like 'Sticks like ****'.
     
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