Survey Survey

Discussion in 'Just Talk' started by tonynoarm, Mar 13, 2010.

  1. tonynoarm

    tonynoarm New Member

    You cannot beat MORI
     
  2. Harry Stottle

    Harry Stottle Screwfix Select

    MORI is pretty good but I like YouGov too, the flowers on their business cards and their distinctive interviewing methods where they ask you about how you will vote do something for me. Last week a nice young lady stopped me in the street and took down my particulars.
     
  3. Chuck Wanoff

    Chuck Wanoff New Member

    The General household survey is pretty good.

    It's a multi-purpose continuous survey carried out by the Social Survey Division of the Office for National Statistics (ONS) which collects information on a range of topics from people living in private households in Great Britain. The survey started in 1971 and has been carried out continuously since then, except for breaks in 1997/98 (when the survey was reviewed) and 1999/2000 when the survey was re-developed.

    The main aim of the survey is to collect data on a range of core topics, comprising:

    household and family information
    housing tenure and household accommodation
    consumer durables including vehicle ownership
    employment
    education
    health and use of health services
    smoking and drinking
    family information including marriage, cohabitation and fertility
    income
    demographic information about household members including migration.
    The information is used by government departments and other organisations for planning, policy and monitoring purposes, and to present a picture of households, families and people in Great Britain.

    The GHS has documented the major changes in households, families and people which have occurred over the last 30 years. These include the decline in average household size and the growth in the proportion of the population who live alone, the increase in the proportion of families headed by a lone parent and in the percentage of people who are cohabiting. It has also recorded changes in housing, such as the growth of home ownership, and the increasing proportion of homes with household facilities and goods such as central heating, washing machines, microwave ovens and home computers. The survey also monitors trends in the prevalence of smoking and drinking.

    The survey is sponsored by ONS, the Department of Health, the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, the Department for Transport, the Department of Culture, Media and Sport; the Department for Work and Pensions (formed from the DSS and part of the DfEE); the Inland Revenue; the Department for Education and Skills (formerly part of DfEE); the Scottish Executive; the Government Actuary’s Department; and a public sector organisation, the Health Development Agency.

    Survey coverage: Great Britain
    Set Sample size: 13,250
    Response Rate: 72%
    Type of survey: Face-to-face interview

    Fieldwork for the GHS is conducted on a financial year basis, with interviewing taking place continuously throughout the year. A sample of approximately 13,000 addresses is selected each year from the Postcode Address File. All adults aged 16 and over are interviewed in each responding household. Demographic and health information is also collected about children in the household.

    All interviews since 1994 have been conducted using Computer Assisted Interviewing - the questionnaire being programmed in Blaise software.

    The new millennium saw the introduction of many enhancements to the methodology of the GHS and a basic change to the way in which the survey is planned and run. These improvements were all designed within the basic proviso that there should be no loss to the sets of time series data which have built up since the inception of the survey.

    The review of the GHS carried out in 1997 concluded that the survey should be re-launched from April 2000 with a different design. The survey was suspended during 1999 to carry out development work for the new survey. From April 2000, the survey consists of two elements: the Continuous Survey and trailers. The Continuous Survey is to remain unchanged for the five-year period April 2000-March 2005, apart from essential changes to take account of, for example, changes in benefits. It consists of a household questionnaire, to be answered by the Household Reference Person or spouse, and an individual questionnaire to be completed by all adults aged 16 and over resident in the household.

    As in previous years, the GHS retains its modular structure, which allows a number of trailers to be included each year to a plan agreed by sponsoring Departments. The trailers included in 2002/3 survey were:

    usual alcohol consumption in the last 12 months
    sport and leisure
    contraception
    hearing
    A major methodological change in 2001 was the introduction of weighting and grossing. A dual weighting scheme was introduced. First, weighting to compensate for non-response in the sample based on known under-coverage in the Census-linked study of non-response. Second, the (weighted) sample was weighted (grossed) up to match known population distributions (as used in the Labour Force Survey).

    The most recent results and details of methodological changes available online can be found at the BookShelf/Compendia and Reference/2000 General Household Survey or by selecting the link below:

    Living in Britain: Results from the 2000 General Household Survey covering the 2000-01 fieldwork year.
    People's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement - results from the social capital module of the General Household Survey 2000
    Carers 2000 - The report of the carers module which was included in the 2000-01 GHS.

    Data from the General Household Survey is widely used in other publications, eg Social Trends and Regional Trends and can also be found in Statbase.
     
  4. gordon bennett

    gordon bennett New Member

    Can you repeat that for me please.
     
  5. Chuck Wanoff

    Chuck Wanoff New Member

    I said "It's a multi-purpose continuous survey carried out by the Social Survey Division of the Office for National Statistics (ONS) which collects information on a range of topics from people living in private households in Great Britain. The survey started in 1971 and has been carried out continuously since then, except for breaks in 1997/98 (when the survey was reviewed) and 1999/2000 when the survey was re-developed.

    The main aim of the survey is to collect data on a range of core topics, comprising:

    household and family information
    housing tenure and household accommodation
    consumer durables including vehicle ownership
    employment
    education
    health and use of health services
    smoking and drinking
    family information including marriage, cohabitation and fertility
    income
    demographic information about household members including migration.
    The information is used by government departments and other organisations for planning, policy and monitoring purposes, and to present a picture of households, families and people in Great Britain.

    The GHS has documented the major changes in households, families and people which have occurred over the last 30 years. These include the decline in average household size and the growth in the proportion of the population who live alone, the increase in the proportion of families headed by a lone parent and in the percentage of people who are cohabiting. It has also recorded changes in housing, such as the growth of home ownership, and the increasing proportion of homes with household facilities and goods such as central heating, washing machines, microwave ovens and home computers. The survey also monitors trends in the prevalence of smoking and drinking.

    The survey is sponsored by ONS, the Department of Health, the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, the Department for Transport, the Department of Culture, Media and Sport; the Department for Work and Pensions (formed from the DSS and part of the DfEE); the Inland Revenue; the Department for Education and Skills (formerly part of DfEE); the Scottish Executive; the Government Actuary’s Department; and a public sector organisation, the Health Development Agency.

    Survey coverage: Great Britain
    Set Sample size: 13,250
    Response Rate: 72%
    Type of survey: Face-to-face interview

    Fieldwork for the GHS is conducted on a financial year basis, with interviewing taking place continuously throughout the year. A sample of approximately 13,000 addresses is selected each year from the Postcode Address File. All adults aged 16 and over are interviewed in each responding household. Demographic and health information is also collected about children in the household.

    All interviews since 1994 have been conducted using Computer Assisted Interviewing - the questionnaire being programmed in Blaise software.

    The new millennium saw the introduction of many enhancements to the methodology of the GHS and a basic change to the way in which the survey is planned and run. These improvements were all designed within the basic proviso that there should be no loss to the sets of time series data which have built up since the inception of the survey.

    The review of the GHS carried out in 1997 concluded that the survey should be re-launched from April 2000 with a different design. The survey was suspended during 1999 to carry out development work for the new survey. From April 2000, the survey consists of two elements: the Continuous Survey and trailers. The Continuous Survey is to remain unchanged for the five-year period April 2000-March 2005, apart from essential changes to take account of, for example, changes in benefits. It consists of a household questionnaire, to be answered by the Household Reference Person or spouse, and an individual questionnaire to be completed by all adults aged 16 and over resident in the household.

    As in previous years, the GHS retains its modular structure, which allows a number of trailers to be included each year to a plan agreed by sponsoring Departments. The trailers included in 2002/3 survey were:

    usual alcohol consumption in the last 12 months
    sport and leisure
    contraception
    hearing
    A major methodological change in 2001 was the introduction of weighting and grossing. A dual weighting scheme was introduced. First, weighting to compensate for non-response in the sample based on known under-coverage in the Census-linked study of non-response. Second, the (weighted) sample was weighted (grossed) up to match known population distributions (as used in the Labour Force Survey).

    The most recent results and details of methodological changes available online can be found at the BookShelf/Compendia and Reference/2000 General Household Survey or by selecting the link below:

    Living in Britain: Results from the 2000 General Household Survey covering the 2000-01 fieldwork year.
    People's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement - results from the social capital module of the General Household Survey 2000
    Carers 2000 - The report of the carers module which was included in the 2000-01 GHS.

    Data from the General Household Survey is widely used in other publications, eg Social Trends and Regional Trends and can also be found in Statbase.
     
  6. Mr GrimNasty

    Mr GrimNasty Active Member

    As funny as a **** in a birthing pool.
     
  7. chippie244

    chippie244 Super Member

    You will get a **** in a birthing pool, during the event!
     

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