talk box sash windows

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Mr Rusty, Nov 3, 2016.

  1. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    Agree it's sits a bit high, but isn't really a problem, just a niggle, old houses are never perfect, been caught out myself.:)

    Excellent windows.:)
     
  2. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Screwfix Select

    Cheers. What I perhaps should have done was completely stripped out the original windows and cleaned out the apertures before taking all the measurements, but then I would have been months with plywood blocking the windows and a dark room! but as you say, only a niggle rather than a problem and I bet few people will notice!
     
  3. Great work, Rusty! I'd never attempt anything like that - you must feel super-chuffed :).

    They are sooo good, in fact, that they look like PVC :p.

    (Any reason you didn't use, say, Ovolo beadings rather than tapered?)
     
  4. There is no need to take out the windows.All you need to do is open the windows and take all the dimensions between the reveals,you can then make the windows with the sizes you now have.
     
  5. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Screwfix Select

    you know, I never thought of that :rolleyes:

    the sashes are dry glazed and internally beaded. The glass is clipped in using reddiseals clipping system and EPDM gaskets. https://www.reddiseals.com/product/flexible-epdm-tape-with-lip/ The outside fixed bead I machined with an ovolo cutter but internally I needed a bead with a decent depth to cover the clipping system + the DGU spacer bars. I used qwood beads https://www.quantumprofilesystems.c...dow-profiles/qw-pgb1-18mm-pinned-glazing-bead which gave me an 18mm x 13mm bead which fitted perfectly. It wasn't so much that they were tapered as they were the ones I found to the dimensions I needed. The rebate is 16mm deep externally which the gasket lip brings up to 18mm externally matched with the 18mm bead internally.

    :):)
     
  6. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Screwfix Select

    Update

    Having spent the last weekends for a few months plasterboarding, flooring and various other jobs its back to windows now. Took this week off to make the 3 sashes for the bay. Need another day to finish ready for painting; by close of play today 3 frames made, 3 bottom sashes made, 3 top sashes all machined up just needing assembly. Bearing in mind I'm starting with rough sawn planks of accoya, it's a full on week of machining for me to machine and make all the profiles!, then assemble - Titan thicknesser and router table have been earning their keep. It's beer o'clock now. Away this weekend doing the Mothers Day necessaries. Photos in a few weeks once I get the bay painted, glazed and installed.
     
  7. Are you using solid accoya?

    Has the first lot you made remained stable?
     
  8. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Screwfix Select

    Yes, I'm starting with rough sawn planks about 150 x 40, 110 x 65 and 130 x 65. The planks are pretty straight to start with and machine easily. The first windows I made and installed have remained absolutely stable - no swelling, warping at all, as I expected them to.

    I am using redwood for the internal linings though, just for cost as these are not exposed to weather. Cills are Utile
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2018
  9. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Screwfix Select

    Must also say, this week after almost continuous machining, I have respect for the old timers who made the original windows with hand tools!
     
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  10. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Screwfix Select

    So have i. My late wife's father was a cabinet maker. He died in 2001 aged 105 and spent all his life working just with hand tools. He was in his mid 80's when he just couldn't see what he was doing anymore before he gave up. Me and him used to have long discussions about how things have moved on with affordable machining. He always said, if there was a machine that could have done the job when he was young, he would have used it. At the time they had no choice but to do it by hand, but given a choice............................they would have grabbed what we have now with all hands :D
     
  11. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Screwfix Select

    Wow 105 in 2001. I bet he had some tales to tell. I expect he was in WW1. But, in my experience of the old boys I've known, they didn't talk about it. This house I'm working on was built by wife's great grandad in 1902 and has never been out the family. We found quite a bit of old family history stuff when we cleared it,
     
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  12. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    It's nice to find old family history stuff when restoring old houses.
     
  13. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Screwfix Select

    Your right, he did have some tales to tell and he never talked about them. That was until we had to go and live with them in the early 1990's recession. I had known him for ages of course, but we had never talked "man to man" so to speak, it was always at family gatherings. That changed when we moved in with them.
    Not going to go through everything he told me, but one thing stands out.
    He was a "driver" in WW1, that is he led a team of horses pulling guns. They had pulled up for one night outside Arras along a very long road, it was well below freezing and all the "drivers" were cold, hungry and knackered. But the first thing a "driver" always had to do was see that his horses were looked after before himself.
    So he settled his horses in a field, made shure they were fed watered and then put there gas masks on. This is the thing that flabergasted me...............................the horses had gas masks..................but the drivers didn't. In other words, the horses were worth more to the army than the guys driving them.
    Anyway.....................in the middle of the night at about -15c all hell broke loose and shells were coming down from everywhere. My wifes father just got up and put his hands out to warm them up in front of the exploding shells.................he had lost the will to live and just wanted to be warm before he died.
    Of course he survived..............and i'm glad he did. I loved him then and still love him now....................he was a better man than i will ever be and certainly a better man than anyone i have ever known.
     
  14. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Screwfix Select

    work in progress
     

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  15. CGN

    CGN Screwfix Select

    Superb work Rusty :)
     
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  16. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Screwfix Select

    Are ya shure you isn't one of them "surreal" artists Rusty :D ................looks like Salvador Dali Just performed lol
     
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  17. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Screwfix Select

    :p:p
     

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  18. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Screwfix Select

    Yep.............................that's how i saw it :D..............................mmmmmmmm could be down to not enough Melot over the weekend.....................good job there's another bottle in the kitchen......................i'll come back and have another look latter to confirm :D
     
  19. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Screwfix Select

    Here we are - end of this saga. Original bay windows removed and new ones installed over the bank holiday weekend. Also had to remake the top part of the cornice. I was hoping everything was going to fit because despite much measuring you don't get to see the reveals until the old ones are out. We did discover the little bit of ceiling in the bay was supported around the edge sitting on loose bricks put in the tops of the original windows. Fortunately no accident but was a near miss when a brick slid out the end as we removed the old frame. Big central sash is a heavy B - weighs 27kg. The original sash weights were 7kg a side so a fair bit of lead make up!

    Still a bit of trimming up and sealing to do round the frames.

    Oh and one other little comment picking up some comments early in the thread - I cut my weight pockets into the inner lining instead of the pulley lining. Turns out while this isn't the way it is usually done here, apparently it is quite common in the US, so there we go. Still think this is the best solution when you have heavy DG sashes - why compromise the integrity of the main pulley lining? It does make the weights harder to access once architrave etc is installed, but if it ever comes to it (I think they will outlast me) it's what multitools are for :p
     

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    Last edited: May 8, 2018
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  20. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    Superb work!:)
     
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