Tiling onto concrete floor

Discussion in 'Tilers' Talk' started by spaceman76, Mar 27, 2020.

  1. spaceman76

    spaceman76 Member

    Hope someone can help, some months ago I laid a new concrete slab floor in my kitchen as I didnt want to tile onto tiles onto tiles ect; so decided to rip it out and lower the level.
    The floor is now completely dry and is fairly level throughout. Ive got porcelain (floorboard type tiles) that i now want to and finally time to do it, I dont want to use self levelling as need access every day.

    Anyone have any tips regarding sealing, type of adhesive, where to start basically. Im in a bit of a situation as the tiler I wanted to get in to do job is off for the forseeable due to the corona, and this would be an ideal time to get it done. Do tilers start in a corner usually ??

    Thanks all
     
  2. CGN

    CGN Screwfix Select

    If you're new to tiling, then do yourself a favour and get the surface as flat as possible to start with. It will save potential frustration.
     
  3. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    Prime it with diluted SBR, normal about 4-1 I think but it’s be on the tub anyway. Fast set bagged powder adhesive, don’t go for white grout whatever you do, depending on size of tiles use a 10mm or 12mm notched trowel, and don’t skimp on hiring tools if good cutters or saws are required for a good finish.

    Invest in a chalk line, measure the room both ways and find the centre, then snap two chalk lines forming a crosshairs over the centre point, then set out your tiles to these lines DRY to see how they would look when finished. If you’re left with a shat slither in any area nudge the tiles whichever direction is needed to look more aesthetically pleasing. And remove the plinths, tile under a few inches or so, then cut them to fit back over the floor once the adhesive has gone off.

    Oh, and don’t tile yourself into a corner where you have to crawl across the worktops to get out, you’ll look like a bit of a ***.
     
  4. spaceman76

    spaceman76 Member

    Yep the surface is flat, its really not too bad, the finish is not polished (feels more like sandpaper) but i made sure the levels are good !
     
    CGN likes this.
  5. spaceman76

    spaceman76 Member

    Great advice thanks, so definitely prime it first (if i can get hold of any dont think our hosts sell it) and use bagged dry adhesive, why not use white adhesive ??
     
  6. spaceman76

    spaceman76 Member

    So if the tiles are 10mm thickness, I use a 10mm notched trowel for the adhesive yes ??
     
  7. CGN

    CGN Screwfix Select

    The notch size depends upon the size of the tiles. The bigger the tile, the bigger the notch. As Jord says, work from the centre (with regards to layout) but adjust to suit the room. If there is only one door into the room, then you may want a full (or nearly full) tile at the threshold, but depends on the type of bond you're going for.
     
  8. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select


    Not adhesive, grout. Because it will turn a light shade of filthy black eventually due to everyday life happening on top of it.
     
    CGN likes this.
  9. spaceman76

    spaceman76 Member

    Right got it, the tiles are 14 cm width and 84 cm long, like a floorboard. Can you recommend a notch size for the trowel from this ??? Also why not use white adhesive, is that so i dont ruin the carpet lol :)
     
  10. spaceman76

    spaceman76 Member

    Haha yes that alright because the grout is charcoal colour.

    Does that flexible adhesive really prevent cracking if there is any slight movement in slab floor ? I put the slab in strips, and there is hairline cracks appeared but not sure if thats caused by movement or by the shrinkage as it dryed out !
     
  11. Abrickie

    Abrickie Well-Known Member

    Just out of curiosity your new floor slab does meet current regs and was signed off by BCO ?
     
  12. spaceman76

    spaceman76 Member

    Yes naturally
     
  13. CGN

    CGN Screwfix Select

    10mm minimum. If there is a high spot start there and work out.
     
  14. Abrickie

    Abrickie Well-Known Member

    Just wondering why strips ? But with reinforcing mesh in it doesn’t matter
     
  15. TheMorg

    TheMorg Active Member

    If you've got floorboard style tiles check for cuppage first (are they bowed), that will help determine if you need a bigger notch size. A bigger notch makes things easier, and ensures full coverage, but uses more adhesive. I would also back butter tiles if you're not entirely confident you will get full coverage.

    Also ensure you spend a lot of time getting a good layout and use the pattern that looks best. I prefer a random staggered joint with planks, and detest a brick bond.
     

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