Tiling over 22mm chipboard floor

Discussion in 'Tilers' Talk' started by Stue, Mar 17, 2008.

  1. Stue

    Stue New Member

    Planning to put down new tiles on bathroom floor, which is 22mm chipboard. What is the best material to lay on floor as a sound base for the tiles to be fixed to. Dont want something that is too thick, the old tiles were layed onto very thin hard board. Is this the way for the new tiles.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jizzard_of_oz

    jizzard_of_oz New Member

    as a rule i never tile on chipboard. i dont like it, it warps when wet, adhesive doesent adhere properly and its basically ****. I would either overboard it with (providing its solid with minimum movement) 6 to 12mm wbp ply or i would rip it up compleatly and put 25mm wbp ply straight over the joists.
     
  3. GKU

    GKU New Member

    Agree with **** , either rip it up and replace with 25mm ply or overlay with minimum 12mm ply .
     
  4. Stue

    Stue New Member

    Thanks for the advice gents. I'll do one or the other of your suggestions. Existing chipboard is warped anyway so ripping it out may be the best idea.
    Cheers.
     
  5. GKU

    GKU New Member

    make sure you <u>SCREW</u> the new ply at 300mm intervals - no more
     
  6. Scaleyback

    Scaleyback New Member

    Not wanting to start another thread in the same vein I thought I'd jump in on this one. I hope the OP doesn't mind.

    My house is about 12 years old and I'm just about to rip out the chipboard T&G floor in the ensuite to replace it prior to tiling. The existing floor is nailed down, not screwed and goes beneath the stud walls on all sides.
    How do I go about removing the existing floor? Can I just use a circular saw set to the correct depth of the existing chipboard, watching out for any nails heads.
    The lay of the existing boards is such that if I cut them flush with the skirting, then I'll end up with some edges floating 'inbetween' joists.
    What do I do?

    Thanks in advance
     
  7. GKU

    GKU New Member

    Unless the chipboard is in a real "state" , I would just overboard it with minimum 12mm ply - and screw the old chipboard down as well as the ply on top of it .
     
  8. Scaleyback

    Scaleyback New Member

    Thanks for the quick response.

    If I add another 12mm to the height of the existing floor and then tile it with 10mm thick tiles, won't there be a pronounced step in the doorway between bedroom & ensuite? How do I overcome that?

    'She that must be obeyed' won't stand for too much of a step and if she stubbed her toe my life wouldn't be worth living.
     
  9. GKU

    GKU New Member

    Excuse my lack of knowledge on terms used in carpet laying , but you can get metal edging strip (the stuff that goes in doorways) which will fit the carpet height on one edge and the other edge is sloped up to fit a higher level such as your situation , tiles etc , (god, reading it back to myself it sounds awful - hope you understand what I'm on about)- got it in our bathroom , don't really notice the difference in the height between the 2 floors .
     
  10. Scaleyback

    Scaleyback New Member

    Again, thanks for the quick response.

    After a discussion with STMBO, we've decided to go with laminate flooring in the bedroom once the ensuite is done.

    I understand what you mean about the threshold strip too. If we eventually go with laminate in the bedroom, then the thickness of the underlay/membrane plus thickness of laminate should be near enough to the thickness of 12mm ply plus 10mm tile so as not to cause too much of a step. This should be acceptable and hopefully no stubbed toes. ;).

    Once I've sheeted the floor out in 12mm ply, should I seal it with anything? If so, any recommendations?

    Thanks for your help
     
  11. GKU

    GKU New Member

    Yes , prime the ply with <u>BAL</u> - NOT PVA !!!
     
  12. Scaleyback

    Scaleyback New Member

    Erm, excuse my ignorance, but I've looked on the BAL site and can't work out what I need.

    Can you post a link for the right stuff please?
     
  13. Extentlon15

    Extentlon15 New Member

    i have been reading on here for a while and plan to tile my front room floor. Good advice but jizzer tends to talk alot of tripe and jump on any bandwagon. I mean sbr - we used that in out concrete and render in the late 90s when i did my time as a bricky, dont use it inside as it is carsongenic. PVA inside. Anyone who uses sbr in confined spaces is a true incompetant fool who is a danger to himself and others working around them.
     
  14. GKU

    GKU New Member

    Its called BAL-PRIME APD -it is on the BAL website .
     
  15. sinewave

    sinewave Screwfix Select

    Can someone explain WHY 25mm WBP is better at resisting flex than 22 T&G Chipboard sheets?


    I'd have thought that WBP, due to it not having any T&G would, despite being 3mm thicker, flex more at thye joints and thus lead to tiles being more prone to cracking etc?
     
  16. GKU

    GKU New Member

    It's not so much that , but chipboard acts like a sponge when it gets wet and then deforms , ie- swells up , forms dips / bumps and loses its shape fairly easily (even the water resitant type), if it gets wet where there is a screw it swells up around the screw and then breaks up around the screw eventually resulting in it breaking away from the screw and becoming "free" , ply is much more durable when it gets hit with water , anything wood based will expand & contract , that is why you use flexible adhesive . The problem is'nt so much with expansion as such , but with the floors ability to deal with water ingress , and ply deals with it better .
     
  17. enjay

    enjay New Member

    It's not so much the flex, no matter what adhesive & grout you use, water will always find its way under the tiles (albeit in small quantities), chipboard + water = swelling = wavy floor = loose tiles.
     
  18. GKU

    GKU New Member

    Great minds .....
     
  19. enjay

    enjay New Member

    You beat me to it press, your answer much more comprehensive than mine, but I think sinewave will know the answer now:)
     
  20. enjay

    enjay New Member

    BTW have you ever tried Butech tile to wood? (made by Porcelanosa) I have never come across anything that sticks so well, always been a Bal man but this stuff is tremendous.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice