TITAN SDS Plus drill bits

Discussion in 'Tool Talk' started by Lokkars Daisy, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. Lokkars Daisy

    Lokkars Daisy New Member

    So the Titan drill at £50 seems ok for making a few holes
    But  the Titan 22m x 1000mm is only £14 odd whilst the Ebaur is £28 odd . Are the Titan bit any good ?
     
  2. J.P.

    J.P. New Member

    SDS rotary hammer drilling action LD - 22mm x 1000mm - it will do the business m8 I would think..how long it will last is anyone's guess, but rotary hammer action does blow the drills through tbqh wether they are cheapish (ish is the operative word ending) or expensive.
     
  3. Lectrician

    Lectrician Screwfix Select

    A nice sharp end (like a bosch) does make all the difference though.
     
  4. J.P.

    J.P. New Member

    Very true Lec - I really cant say what is best, but have been using Bosch and other cheaper bits and no problems. What can you really say about larger OD SDS drill bits? - I don't use mine that often, but if it was repetitive work then obviously this would sort the bad from the good a lot better and would allow me to be more subjective with respect to them.
     
  5. Lokkars Daisy

    Lokkars Daisy New Member

    This will probably be seldom used , it's for 600mm is stone wall, you know the old type building stone outer rubble inner type o thing . I have had several sets of Ebaur auger bits for wood and they are pretty good. If the Titan bent or whatever then I would steer clear , but they do the cheap drill which has great reviews so perhaps the bits are OK even if cheap
     
  6. I doubt very, very much it'll bend. The only difference I suspect you'll notice in practice is that the Ferm bits might not last as long. Even then, they do just lose their keen edge, tho' - I haven't had one actually self-destruct yet.

    I bought one of them Ferm SDS drills for around £30 from SF around 6-7 years ago. The drill itself finally gave up hammering effectively last year whilst trying to break up some concrete around a rotting post. It had some abuse, and paid for itself many times over.

    I still have the actual set of drill bits taht came with it tho', still going strong.
     
  7. Lokkars Daisy

    Lokkars Daisy New Member

    just had a look in CPC they have 3 x Duratooll 1000 x 12, 16 and 24mm for only £9.96  ?
     
  8. Having said that, even tho' it goes through concrete with little effort, I'm not sure how well it'll cope with actual large 'stones'. Depends on what they're made of, I guess? I wonder if you need a diamond-tipped core drill?
     
  9. Lokkars Daisy

    Lokkars Daisy New Member

    What Ferm bits DA , are they the same as Titan
     
  10. Similar, I guess - Ferm was very much a budget brand, but very good value.

    I replaced my worn-out Ferm with a Worx that was on very good offer at Argos. I also bought a complete set of Worx masonry bits that was at half-price; something daft like £12 for a box of 12. I used the 18mm one earlier today to go into a concrete slab. Effortless.

    Would peeps on here recommend a smaller 'pilot' hole first? Either way, when you comes to drilling, let the drill do all the work at its own pace - don't push too hard.
     
  11. J.P.

    J.P. New Member

    Stone wall LD. Sounds like a flint cobbled type wall to me (knowing the type of place where you live), but of course only guessing. I mean if you are drilling through flint shards (not block flint) or other types of very hard stone, then definitely would do as DA says and drill a say 3/8 in pilot (a tad over 9.5mm), and then take it up to what 15mm, and then the 22mm - then again saying that the 22mm might just blast straight through the wall - perhaps if you could post wall composition - then something more definitive might arise LD.
     
  12. Lectrician

    Lectrician Screwfix Select

    I generally dont pilot - drill bits these days are good enough to just go for it.  Piloting takes more time, and you end up with the drill snagging.  Stone walls can be the worst - sections of hard stone, sections of soft mud, shale, slate, this is when you need a decent drill - the cheaper ones will end up with the clutch slipping at every little snag or blockage.  Walls like this are a PITA if you try to core a hole.
     
  13. Well, you have your answers, Lokks! The decision is yours....

    I reckon, for most brick, block, poured-concrete, stone, etc walls, there will be little difference in performance.

    If it's something well'ard, then a decent brand might, literally, have the edge.

    If you do decide to pilot first, make the first drill size significantly less than what you are going to end up with. Leccy is right about snagging, but I think is only a problem if the hole size and next-size-up bits are too close.

    (My very first experience with a 'Hilti' was to drill a hole for a toilet overflow through pebbly blocks. Being in my early teens, I thought it would be a good idea to drill a pilot hole just a couple of mm smaller than the final one. Jeepers, parents would walk by checking on how many revolutions I'd done :()
     
  14. And when you do the job - whatever you decide - allow the drill to do the work - don't 'push' too hard. Think of the weight of the drill, say 5kg, and use a similar force when going horizontally.
     
  15. Captain Leaky

    Captain Leaky New Member

    Titan drills make good door stops...and thats about it. :(
     
  16. J.P.

    J.P. New Member

    My Direct Power SDS smoked today LD and it is trashed - bought the Titan from Screwfix just down the road from me and for the dosh £49.99 its doing the biz. SDS drills look ok and stuff and the chisels are doing fine (all supplied with drill) - its got a 2 year guarantee and it is well made - not bad for a tad under 50 sovs -

    [​IMG]

    The new Titan SDS drill in chisel mode..

    [​IMG]

    A short time later and it has done the biz..
     
  17. Lectrician

    Lectrician Screwfix Select

    Should have gone for an SDS Max for that sort of job JP!
     
  18. Lokkars Daisy

    Lokkars Daisy New Member

    Thanks DA and all. I think what you say rings true having since spoken to one person who bought the Titan drill along with a pack of 3x 1000mm x 24mm and down cheapo other make bits, less than £20. He is a mason or bricky as I think you call them . The Titan drill is starting to fizz and pop now he says, maybe brushes needed, he hasn't checked it out as he's not too bothered because the drill was less than £50 and has well paid for its self.
    So, the considerably cheaper bits do the job and last the course for average use
    The considerably more expensive bit's also do the job , perhaps more quickly , and perhaps last longer, but is it worth the far greater outlay.
    For ocasional use I'm persuaded that the cheapest is as good as any.
    For constant every day use, where speed and lack of down time is important then perhaps the expensive options are more suited.
    Captain Leaky , surely you are mistaken, have you read the reviews?
     
  19. Lokkars Daisy

    Lokkars Daisy New Member

    Flippin heck JP ! up in tha attic then in the basement , thinks your in a mansion like wot sinedolls got
    Should ave got yer Titan delivered , only £45.00 delivered
     
  20. J.P.

    J.P. New Member

    Cant really warrant paying out any more then 50 sovs Lec - different if I was in the game still, but for DIY its doing the business m8 - pleased with the drill and it has got a two year guarantee..so cant really go wrong really I spose.  Will be using it in the future for a 4in core or whatever diameter the boiler flue is (going through the wall) and a what 42mm (40mm waste pipe) for a waste and stuff. Its good enough for me tbqh.
     

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