Toolboxes vs. Tool chest

Discussion in 'Tool Talk' started by Theleman, Nov 29, 2018.

  1. Theleman

    Theleman Active Member

    No, I wouldn't. Because Petrol car is not kept in wooden shed. It gets parked on the drive way.
     
  2. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    Only one decent make for petrol hedge cutters, Stihl, got one here with 30" cutter bar, about 10 years old, starts 2nd pull, & has lived in shed for 10 years, hasn't burnt it down yet.
    But, I do keep petrol can outside in bin storage area,gallon of petrol exploding in confine space would do a lot of damage..

    But, you can get the Stihl HS45, 30mm capicity,with 24" bar for under £200.

    https://www.stihl.co.uk/STIHL-Produ...l-hedge-trimmers/21517-610/HS-45-24-60cm.aspx
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2018
  3. Theleman

    Theleman Active Member

    I would have thought Stihl would cost a lot more, but under £200 isn't bad at all.
    It still can just cut upto 30mm branches. Less than the Bosch AHS65-34.

    So this Bosch AHS 65-34 is quite a machine for just under £100, although it is electric, it cuts upto 34mm branches.
    It has most powerful motor too.

    If I had outside safe storage for petrol, maybe Petrol cutter like Stihl would be better option.
     
  4. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    Only reason I don't keep in shed, it has concrete roof, in summer it get very toasty in there, left a can half full in there by accident & plastic can swelled up, as to other shed, rats might chew it.
     
  5. Theleman

    Theleman Active Member

    Yes, petrol is highly explosive fuel. Very dangerous if stored in wooden shed or any sheds, I feel.

    Do rats and mice come into brick built sheds too? :(
     
  6. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    No.

    Have laid posion, never been taken unlike like in wooden shed.
     
    Theleman likes this.
  7. Theleman

    Theleman Active Member

    I sprayed with strong bleach on my shed floor and walls, and they seem gone now.
    I put some traps as seen on Youtube, but no mice has jump into it for many days now.

    I was going to put glue trap, after all this, if they are still around, but none seem coming in.
     
  8. Theleman

    Theleman Active Member

    You must have been suspicious :)
     
  9. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    Not cold enough yet, temps drop a few degrees & they will be knocking on door to come in.
     
  10. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    Just being prepared, too much to loose with things being chewed,manuals, engineering books,etc.
     
  11. Theleman

    Theleman Active Member


    If they come into the shed, this time Glue traps will be waiting for them.
     
  12. Theleman

    Theleman Active Member

    Yes, they chew every papery stuff, boxes, manuals and books.

    I had to throw out 5 boxes of manuals and books kept in the shed into bin.

    I read they even chew electric cables and power cables of tools making unusable and dangerous. There are reports that they chew also water & gas pipes causing leaks.
     
  13. robertpstubbs

    robertpstubbs Screwfix Select

    I have a 6”x6” hole in my garage door and get no mice in it. But I do have a tabby rodent control executive.
     
  14. Theleman

    Theleman Active Member

  15. Job and Knock

    Job and Knock New Member

    Yes. I have one of each (plus a DRT50 cordless). Brilliant bits of kit

    Not really. It's American. Anyone with an outdoor cat should realise that they hunt and will pick-up fleas and worms - so you need to deworm and de-flea regularly (and if they don't they should be allowed to have a cat). Unlike the USA plague (bubonic or pneumonic) isn't really seen in the UK because we are an island, and in any case the original carriers were black rats, not the brown ones we see here (or mice for that matter). TBH I reckon that I'm at a greater risk of contracting Weile's disease (a severe form of leptospirosis) on construction sites from my day job than I am of getting anything from the cat. This is the real problem with life, it's terminal.....

    And to return to the original topic, I've opted to carry cordless/hand tools in a combination of Stanley portable tool boxes (I have two of these Stanley Pro Mobile chests) plus larger ones (I have one of the current Stanley FatMax 73601 chests and one older Stanley FatMax 194850 chests) plus Makita Makpacs and Festool Systainers for specific tools like plunge saws. For smaller jobs I can often shoehorn a kit into a ProMobile plus one of the Fat Maxes with maybe a couple of Systainers/Makpacs for specialised kit. It just takes a bit of thought. Ah, the joys of being site based
     
  16. ginger tuffs

    ginger tuffs Screwfix Select

    my tool boxs is back of van and a few painter bucket i wish i was organised
     
  17. Job and Knock

    Job and Knock New Member

    Give up driving a van and work on a city centre job where you can't park the motor even remotely near. Then get the train to work for 4 months (Saving £5 diesel a day, £8 parking a day and 30 minutes travel each way). I guarantee you that you'll get a lot more organised!
     
  18. sospan

    sospan Screwfix Select

    I am often surprised that guys don't get stopped taking tools onto trains - hammers, plasterboard saws, various blades and chemicals
     
  19. Job and Knock

    Job and Knock New Member

    Don't need to carry chemicals, they always get delivered to site. My tool boxes are padlocked in transit. Years ago I remember the BT engineers in central London travelling on the tube to visit sites (parts were delivered by a shuttle van service in the main) and they were carrying round a veritable arsenal of "weapons" which they would sometimes leave on the tube. No chance of that with a roll-along box. Mostly use the van on the first and last day and only then leaving me to take specialised kit on and off as required on the train
     
  20. Theleman

    Theleman Active Member

    Didn't know that. I actually have only seen mice droppings in my shed this summer for the first time, and never have encountered them in real existence.

    Now I own 2x petrol chainsaws, I start them time to time, close the shed door let engine idle for a few minutes in the shed letting out the petrol fumes in the shed, while I am tidying stuff in the garden, which makes the shed fully soaked with petrol smell.

    I then go into the shed, switch the engine off and lock the shed door for the night trying to tell any mice in the shed to move away. It seems working OK. Haven't seen any mice droppings or stuff getting chewed in the shed recently.
     

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