Toothbrush/shaver socket

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by Possom, Aug 28, 2017.

  1. Possom

    Possom Member

    Most of the shaver sockets shown on the ScrewFix website state "Shavers only" on the faceplate.

    Are there any similar type socket on the ScrewFix website which can be used to charge a toothbrush in a bathroom?

    Also, many of the shaver sockets (though not all) are dual voltage. Is this an important feature to have, or is it unnecessary?

    Thanks.
     
  2. They'll handle your toothbrush with no issues.

    Just don't plug a heater or hair drier in there...

    You don't need dual voltage either - that's only to be sociable to your foreign guests.

    Probably.
     
    seneca likes this.
  3. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    Agreed DA, I use my shaver socket all the time for our rechargeable toothbrushes.
     
    Possom likes this.
  4. Pollowick

    Pollowick Screwfix Select

    Sorry, but they will not unless specifically approved or tested. I have seen several cases where toothbrushes have been left plugged in and the face plate actually cracks.

    The MK version is approved for dual use: http://www.screwfix.com/p/mk-dual-voltage-shaver-socket-115-230v-white/55378

    Select Q&A then go to page two where you will find the following:

     
    Possom and Deleted member 33931 like this.
  5. I need to shut up :oops:
     
    KIAB likes this.
  6. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Screwfix Select

    Shaver sockets have a 20 watt transformer for isolation in them. When you put the plug in the transformer is connected to the supply, normally only for a few minutes when shaving. Charging a toothbrush takes longer and the transformer may get warm leading to the discolouration and cracking of the faceplate as mentioned by others. In short, yes it will work but the socket may eventually fail.
     
  7. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    Mine's only been in use every day with toothbrush plugged in for about 12 years so I suppose it's not been fully tested yet! :D
     
  8. Pollowick

    Pollowick Screwfix Select

    Not just toothbrushes which often take 24 hours to charge or are designed to be permanently trickle charging but rechargeable shavers too.

    This image shows a shaver only version - with the small logo and text "shavers only" that has cracked. There is a fixing screw holding the transformer in place just on the crack, close to the arrow head. The right half is one that is toothbrush compatible and is used regularly with the Shaver and Toothbrush logo


    shaver_toothbrush.jpg
     
  9. CraigMcK

    CraigMcK Screwfix Select

    I have also used toothbrushes in mine for many years without any issues. That cracked plate looks like a stress fracture coming from the fixing. It may well be the plastic expanding, but the fixing being a little too tight giving it nowhere to go

    EDIT: Just as a point I suspect my shaver will draw a higher load than my toothbrush. it does not say no rechargeable shavers on the logo, or indeed any of the documents I can find.
    I would expect the "Shavers only" refers more to "don't plug in your euro plug hairdryer" type statement
     
    seneca likes this.
  10. Possom

    Possom Member

    Which brand is it? o_O
     
  11. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    MK.
     
    Possom likes this.
  12. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    Exactly Craig, I reckon it only says "shavers only" to prevent some numpties plugging their hair dryers or fan heaters into it! I used my plug in shavers on mine for years but the past 5 years or so have used re-chargeable ones which draw even less power.
     
  13. MGW

    MGW Screwfix Select

    As said 20 VA max rating my beard clippers are 10W likely larger than most shavers, but some of the special tooth cleaning units go up to 30W and there have been posts about using them in bathrooms, seems other countries do not have the 20 VA limit, and for UK they make battery driven units as the bathroom socket is not big enough. However for my rechargeable stuff it is not left in the bathroom, there is no need, it is cordless. Units like this can not be used in UK bathrooms. OK maybe a little OTT but people do try plugging them in. The socket is de-energised when there is nothing plugged in, items should only be plugged in while in use. If you knock a tooth brush charger into the sink when plugged into an isolation transformer it will not trip the RCD. OK 20 VA is not a lot of power, but a shaver in ones hand is one thing, an electric tooth brush OK but not a rechargeable tooth brush or shaver, too easy to end up in the sink or bath. Not thinking of regulations just safety.
     
  14. Dr Bodgit

    Dr Bodgit Super Member

    My tooth brush (a Braun) take about 24 hours to charge and gives around 10-12 brushes per charge whereas my Shaver takes only an hour to charge and will last a few weeks. I conclude that my shaver takes a far higher current when charging but its for a relatively short period of time.
     
  15. CraigMcK

    CraigMcK Screwfix Select

    My Philishave 9000 series uses max 9W. Yes much more than the 1.5w~ of a toothbrush, but not a huge amount, the fact they are showing a standby power figure suggests they expect it to be plugged in all the time

    upload_2017-8-29_10-52-20.png
     
  16. Pollowick

    Pollowick Screwfix Select

    It is not the charging/operational current but the losses that all transformers have which causes the heating and that does not vary much depending on load. So, a short 1 hour 20VA burst may not heat the core up significantly, whereas a 24hour 5VA will raise the temperature quite a way
     
  17. Dr Bodgit

    Dr Bodgit Super Member

    Don't modern shaver sockets use SMPS? Transformers are so last century.
     
  18. Possom

    Possom Member

    I'm unsure specifically what you mean here - apologies if I'm missing the obvious.

    Is your concern with the possibility that the charger unit for a rechargeable cordless toothbrush could fall into a water-filled hand basin?

    If this were to happen the RCD does not trip, so there is the potential for shock? Are you saying that it's best not to have the charging base for a cordless toothbrush in the bathroom?
     
  19. JP.

    JP. Screwfix Select

    If the energised charger base fell into a basin full of water the rcd would not trip
     
  20. Possom

    Possom Member

    By "energised" do you specifically mean whilst plugged into the shaver (or toothbrush) wall socket?
     

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