Trimming doors

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by GeoffB, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    hello
    are you sure it was a spoke shave dunc? that would only really take off about as much as a plane, but leaving a nice curve in the door stile, sounds like it may have been a draw knife!;)
     
  2. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    hello
    sounds like it may have been the same bloke who fitted those skirtings a while back, you probably remember the photos! and to be fair your sister can only go on what the guy said to her about his trade, blatantly not a carpenter as we don't leave doors in that state anyways i'm sure she will ask you in future to do anything like that, as this other guy totally sucked!
    liked the ref to the singer too , might have to use that sometime;)
     
  3. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    hello
    and by the way i still don't use power tools for skirtings!
     
  4. was dunc before

    was dunc before New Member

    that's right a draw knife. luckily the grain was in favour on the stile. but it got it down in no time.
     
  5. mof

    mof Member

    Well there we have it,   "was d before" used   a draw knife, we all know a door should fit in the frame most of the time without needing any trimming off the stiles it certainly does if I make the frame, but sometimes when you fit a door in a old house or in a frame a cowboy fitted you sometimes have to take quite a bit off. A axe was in all joiners tool kit for making plugs for skirting, door frames, picture rail, etc.
     
  6. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    hello
    so i guess you have to be lucky with the grain to use a draw knife, and  to be fair to you mr gw you would have to be a lot more skillful than i am with an axe (which i am not) to make it a viable tool for doors, i would love to see that,as i imagine that even though it's an axe it doesn't mean it has to be rough! so old school solid doors with over 3/4 of an inch to nowt on one side. perhaps if executed well , by you, then ill go with that, would still like to see it done well enough that you can recover the door edge with a plane as we all know doors and axes normally don't get on!!
     
  7. mof

    mof Member

    Well the way it was done was simmilar to how you cut into the door for a hinge, cut almost verticaly int the door along the edge then the chips will break off, one would not try to chop along the grain obviously or you would split into the part that was to be left. I would not like to try it with a draw knife either as a split could go in the wrong direction into the door. Dunc obviously read the grain direction before he used the draw knife. Anyway it sounds as though I use a axe all the time, not so, this was in the 50,s early 60,s, I started work in 1957.
     
  8. was dunc before

    was dunc before New Member

    As it happens I bought a vintage set of carpentry tools on ebay. Saws you can sharpen, a record 1 ton vice, block plane,  files, and other decent and useful carpentry tools all for 15 quid. A real bargain. It also included a kindling axe, which now makes sense.
     
  9. surfermick

    surfermick New Member

    i dont understand all this knocking carpenters stuff going on, its all so narrow minded. any trade/job/business you get good and bad, the problem is any diy person who looses a job can have a go at being a tradees person and make a hash of jobs, it just means a prpoer trades person has to come in and sort it. BUT it doesnt mean all carpenters/painters/buliders are rubbish. blinkers off time.
     
  10. surfermick

    surfermick New Member

    i for one would only hire a trade man on my jobs, never a handyman.
     

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