Undercutting door jambs

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Damian Misiak, Jun 8, 2021.

  1. Damian Misiak

    Damian Misiak New Member

    Hi everyone,
    I'm planning on putting a new OSB floorboards on top of my existing floor (please don't judge me on this :)) and then laminate flooring. I've watched a dozens of YT videos and in all of them they say you should undercut door frame to nicely fit laminate underneath.
    But check my pictures, am I really supposed to cut out the whole bottom piece of my jambs? It's pretty thick, plus metal detector says that there is probably a screw or nail in there. Will this have no effect on how the whole frame holds up?
    Any advice welcome! IMG_20210608_194141_resize_2.jpg IMG_20210608_194526_resize_4.jpg IMG_20210608_194045_resize_70.jpg
     
  2. CGN

    CGN Screwfix Select

    multi tool and some wood chisels. Easy enough to do and is common practice when doing a decent install. The frame is screwed to the walls, so don’t worry about cutting a bit off the bottom. Once you’ve done one, you’ll get more confidence.
     
  3. Shytot

    Shytot Active Member

    Bi metal blades
     
  4. Damian Misiak

    Damian Misiak New Member

    Thanks guys, I actually went ahead and tried with one. There were two nails holding it to the floor, which I managed to remove. But now I can move the whole thing with my hands. It's on wall between two bedrooms, so two door frames are kind of joined together by architrave. Without the nails now I can move it around and see the little part of wall on the bottom moving with the frames:mad:
    That can't be good?

    IMG_20210608_205221_compress52.jpg
    IMG_20210608_205242_compress42.jpg
     
  5. Damian Misiak

    Damian Misiak New Member

    House was built in 1956, any ideas what this wall could be made of? I'm new with all the UK standards, would frame fixings for example make any difference? Is there something to fix it to? I'm thinking about trying to fix the frame to the wall, as long as there is something stable behind door jambs. What could possibly be there to cause such an easy movement of the whole thing?
     
  6. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Screwfix Select

    It looks to me like that is a non-structural wall built directly onto the floorboards and the nails into the floorboards which you have removed were supporting the end of the wall from moving. If the bottom of the wall isn't secure, with two doors on, it is going to be a problem. What I would do is take all the timber off and fix a new timber in place to secure the wall and then remake the architraves together with a new facing board that sits down on to the new floor. It looks a little non-standard construction so you are going to have to make good in the best way possible.
     
  7. Damian Misiak

    Damian Misiak New Member

    Ok, let me just double check that I've got this right. So you're suggesting to rip out the whole thing, put a new door frame, screw it to the floor, then put another board on top of the frame and this one will cover my expansion gap and will be the one that doors are fixed to? Surely that would make my door opening narrower, right?
     
  8. Mr Rusty

    Mr Rusty Screwfix Select

    TBH it's difficult to see exactly what you have and where the doors are positioned. However, there is no doubt that the wall is on top of the floorboards, ehich suggests it is a stud/non-structural wall, and if by removing the bottom of the timber the wall is now loose, it has to be corrected with new timber.
     
  9. Damian Misiak

    Damian Misiak New Member

    Thanks Mr Rusty. I'm new to the UK building standards, so just wanted to make sure what I'm dealing with. I'll find a way to secure it properly!
     

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