Using galvanised conduit outdoors

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by Mike P, Feb 3, 2004.

  1. Mike P

    Mike P New Member

    I'm going to run cabling for lamps in my garden soon, and I was wondering how easy this stuff is to work with, as I've never used it. I'd like to use it as the exposed metalwork would suit what is a pretty urban garden design, rather than tacking SWA all over the place.

    Apologies if these questions are a bit noddy, but:

    Are there any good guides covering assembly?
    How do you keep the joints weatherproof. I can see neoprene gaskets for the box lids, but do you PTFE the threads as well?
    How do you join cables for switches etc? Do you fit a standard junction box inside the galvanised tee boxes or use choc-o-blocs?
    Finally, I assume the conduit must have a connection to earth for safety purposes - what's the approved method(s)?

    Any help would be appreciated, cheers.
     
  2. gerrin2owd

    gerrin2owd New Member

    If your just doing this one job, dont even think about using it as you will ---- it up!
     
  3. Mike P

    Mike P New Member

    Is that a warning from personal experience? If so, what wentt wrong?
     
  4. gerrin2owd

    gerrin2owd New Member

    It is a warning from personal experience, because I installed it for 30 years. Firstly you need the "know how" to use a bending machine or block to be able to "bend", "set" and "kick" it, then it needs cutting and threading (stocks & dies and paste required).

    I am just trying to save you a lot of hassle for yourself. Dont get me wrong its not rocket science but you do need quite a bit of experience to become proficient with it. If your not convinced, have a go!:)
     
  5. limestone cowboy

    limestone cowboy New Member

    You could use black plastic conduit if you solvent cement the joints and use gaskets. It can be laid out 'dry' then glued when you're happy with it. And it's cheaper and easier to work with. You only need a hacksaw. OK it wont look as good as well installed steel conduit, but it will be more like what you want than SWA or T&E. I've seen it used in old farm buildings and it looks alright.
     
  6. Mike P

    Mike P New Member

    Thanks for the advice, folks - I'll look into the black plastic conduit, as 30 years of advice telling me this is hard is not to be ignored lightly!

    Do you have any advice on the other part of my question, ie what components do you use for connecting wiring when working with conduit?
     

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