Victorian Garden Wall pillars

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by Ben Miners, Jun 13, 2018 at 8:53 AM.

  1. Ben Miners

    Ben Miners New Member

    Hi. I am wanting to build a traditional victorian style wall similar to the following using flemish bond. My question is does anyone know how to create the types of pillars you see on the wall, and if so does anyone have any tutorials on how you do this? I suppose I am stuck on how you create these types of pillars but also how you connect them to the wall? Sorry if I am being stupid but this is my first time building something like this. Many Thanks for your help.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/36671411@N06/27901167857/in/dateposted-public/
     
  2. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    See page 11 & 12 of this link,might be useful your going to have fun with it,it will have you pulling your head out.

    https://www.slideshare.net/SahilPahal/brick-walling-and-joints

    Work it out dry courses first & second, then draw it onto paper,or take photo's, it's all too easy to go out of bond with headers,queen closers, halfs & quarters.:D

    When you take down old walls with flemish bond, it's a work of art, how they did the bonds,for piers & intersections,seen it were one brick had a clipped corner on one course.

    Also see pages 20-22 of this link.

    https://www.slideshare.net/munawar164164/lecture-2-brickbrick-masonary-and-manufacturing-of-bricks

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. stuart44

    stuart44 Active Member

    If you want to build a 9 inch thick wall in Flemish bond with piers 18 inches long the bottom pic is close to want you want for the correct bonding. First course is a 3/4 on each end of the pier and then a header in the centre to tie in.
    Next course is header on each end of the pier to tie in and stretcher in the centre of the pier.
    Most bricklayers would probably just do it as in your photo to save cutting 3/4's, the bond on that wall is really Flemish Garden Wall bond.
     
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  4. Ben Miners

    Ben Miners New Member

    thanks for all the help, but is there any clearer images I can download for this, or any books or videos that might help? Its just tricky to learn from those photos. Much appreciated.
     
  5. Ben Miners

    Ben Miners New Member

    there must be some video tutorials for these piers
     
  6. Ben Miners

    Ben Miners New Member

    is this how the piers should be built?

     
    KIAB likes this.
  7. stuart44

    stuart44 Active Member

    That's correct for a 13 inch long pier. It does mean cutting some King closers. If you make the piers 18 inch long as in your photo you only need to cut 3/4's and the 1/4 pieces can be used in the wall where the bat is needed.
     
  8. Ben Miners

    Ben Miners New Member

    so on a 18 inch pier you would not need king closers at all? Sorry I am trying to visualise how a cross section like above would look on a 18 inch pier? Any chance you could do a quick sketch please, as if what you say saves time then it sounds like a good idea, as the pillars don't have to be 13 inch, that was the only reference I could find that shows how you build them. thanks again for all your help its much appreciated.
     
  9. stuart44

    stuart44 Active Member

    Sorry, I don't know how to put a sketch on. It's similar to the last one on KIAB's pic, except that wall is 1.5 bricks thick.
    If you lay the wall out in Flemish bond, where you want the pier you bring out the pier next to a header with another header half a brick out. Then use a stretcher and then another header back into the wall.
    Next course a header goes in the centre of the pier stretcher and have a 3/4 bat both sides of the header.
     
  10. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    :eek::(
     
  11. sospan

    sospan Well-Known Member

    Unless you are really proficient at bricklaying the "perps" on this type of wall will be out quite quickly. Even in the sample picture you posted there a few places where it has been "corrected" some due to the variable brick sizes. You will also have to be really careful with the bricks and also cement mixes as variations will show up. The footings for a wall like this will have to be spot on as it will be difficult to correct and also has to be poured taking into account the pier positions.

    If this is going to be a prominent feature wall and there is a strong desire for that effect then I would consider getting in a time served bricky. However, even then many will not want do a full keyed in pillar but a tied in one.
     
  12. Ben Miners

    Ben Miners New Member

    thanks all, much appreciated. Can anyone recommend any good books for this type of thing? cheers
     
  13. sospan

    sospan Well-Known Member

    A book on general bricklaying and techniques or brickwork styles ?
     
  14. Ben Miners

    Ben Miners New Member

    yeah but struggling to find anything, can you suggest anything off amazon? cheers
     
  15. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Hard to find decent modern books on brick bonds.

    David Hancock did Brick Bonding: The Rules of Bonding and 100 + Advanced Craft Questions with Answers, way back in 1990.

    But,old books are better like Pitman's Vol 4 - Bonding from about 1926, there a whole set of them, but they are hard to find today.

    Modern Buildings, Their Planning, Construction And Equipment Vol1", by G. A. T. Middleton,again several in series.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2018 at 10:28 AM
  16. stuart44

    stuart44 Active Member

    With bricklaying you want to practice getting used to the feel of the tools before you start on the wall. It's difficult to learn this from a book, but you may be better watching some ytube clips to give you a better idea.
    Get a bag of lime and sand and practice rolling the mortar on the board, laying an even bed and buttering up bricks etc.
    You could start with Brickwork One by W.G.Nash if you want a book.
     
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  17. stuart44

    stuart44 Active Member

    There was one printed in the 70's called Brickwork bonding problems and solutions by W.G.Nash.
     
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  18. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    He did a whole set on them.

    Got a few books here somewhere from 1880's to 1900's on brickwork, use to pick them up in secondbook shops & charity shops when I see them.
     
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  19. stuart44

    stuart44 Active Member

    Just had a quick look on Amazon, they are selling for over £400. I've got an old copy somewhere, hope my wife has not slung it out.
     
  20. sospan

    sospan Well-Known Member

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