VOIP

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by KIAB, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Anyone on this forum use VOIP (Voice over Internet Protocol),if so what provider, any problems with it.
    Don't make that many calls, so been looking at VOIP as you can get mobile apps,etc & save some pennies.:)
     
  2. snappyfish

    snappyfish Active Member

    I don't use myself but a friend of mine who dabbles in web design and techy stuff uses this company.

    Linky

    £5 Lobby service plan (Perfect for lobby or reception areas and for those that do not need to make outbound calls)
     
    KIAB likes this.
  3. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Looked at Vonage,4Com,Lily Comms & a few others for a residential service.
     
  4. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    I presume this is different to Skpye and whatsap?
     
  5. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    There are and always have been some issues with VOIP. The largest and most obvious one is, unless you have FTTP, your internet connection will always need a landline connection anyway. So you would still be paying for that. As most Providers give you "X" mins free per month for landline calls, the question has to be, do you even use all those mins ? I know i don't because i use my mobile for calls because they are all free. Where VOIP comes into it's own, so to speak, is if you make a large amount's of international calls.............then it's a no brainer.
    At home i use a router that has a dedicated VOIP input for a phone but never used it because a VOIP phone would cost more than i'm ever likely to save.
     
  6. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    You don't need to look at anyone, as long as your Router has a VOIP connection you can just use it with you current ISP.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2018
  7. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    Technically speaking Chip, no it's not. I use Whatsapp a lot, all my motorbike mates are on there as a "Group" and we talk all the time. When you make a call to another Whatsapp contact, it's in effect a VOIP call, so costs nothing but will eat into your Data allowance from your mobile company.
     
  8. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    If your phone was on Free Wi-Fi it would come out of that though?
     
  9. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    Lol, yes it would Chip. Thing is though, i would never ever use Free Public WI-FI. Defo not on my mobile and even more so when using my laptop. A hacker is just 10ft away from you lol...............using his/hers laptop to harvest as much as they can from your device.
     
  10. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member

    Have three VOIP numbers here. One with SIPGATE and two with Port5060.

    The Port5060 service https://www.port5060.net/about-us/ is fine and we use their business grade service. Plenty of options and you can transfer in any of your existing numbers should you wish so my old ISDN/PSTN numbers are now routed through them.
     
  11. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    I meant my own unlimited Wi-Fi :)
    I was just wondering as I have a talkative S in L in Switzerland but apparently she mainly does the calling.
     
  12. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    Over your own home WI-FI................of course its free........................and safe as long as you have changed the default Login to your router.
     
  13. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    I not only changed it I didn't tell anyone what it was and then I forgot it, how secure is that :):):)
     
  14. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D as long as it was secure in the first place.................you is still safe :D. I would do the same as me though.........................go see your doctor for a memory test, just can't remember the last time i did though :D
     
  15. rogerk101

    rogerk101 Active Member

    VoIP stands for Voice over Internet Protocol, and simply means that the voice signals of a call are routed as 'packets' of data over the Internet. Before VoIP, the voice signals already digital, but they were sent as a continuous stream instead of routed as discrete packets. Before digital telephony, (around 30 years ago) the voice signals were sent as analogue signals from the source all the way to the destination.

    Nowadays, almost every call made in the UK uses VoIP somewhere along the calling path. Calls may not be completely VoIP end-to-end, but they are almost certainly converted to VoIP somewhere between the caller and the called.

    I think what the OP was asking was whether to buy a 'VoIP phone' that connects to the home broadband router using either an ethernet cable or over WiFi.

    Some broadband routers have a built-in Analogue Telephone Adaptor (ATA), which enables an old style analogue phone to be plugged into it with the old style BT phone cable. In this case the analogue to VoIP conversion is done in the broadband router before it leaves your home. However, even if your broadband router sits alongside your old style analogue phone, and uses old style copper wire to get from your home to the local exchange, the voice call is converted to VoIP in the local exchange.

    BTW, roughly speaking mobile telephony has followed almost the same generations ...
    • 1G was analogue voice and modulated digital SMS
    • 2G was analogue voice and digital SMS
    • 3G was streamed digital voice and digital SMS
    • 4G is packetized voice and data
    • 5G is packetized voice and data (like 4G), but much bigger bandwidth
     
  16. facilities

    facilities Well-Known Member

    Chips message me your password and I will have it in case you forget it again, don’t need your bank details at this stage
     
  17. facilities

    facilities Well-Known Member

    I also use WhatsApp think it’s great for all things, videos, pictures, groups etc. But wonder if there’s a catch, certainly no adverts are popping up, but wondering if they are harvesting info some how
     
  18. CraigMcK

    CraigMcK Well-Known Member

    WhatsApp is owned by Facebook. When you agree to the terms you allow it to harvest all of your contacts. They know who you know...
     

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