What fixings for mounting cab to breese blocks/cinder block?

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by thestraycat, Jun 18, 2021.

  1. thestraycat

    thestraycat Member

    Hi guys,

    Quick and easy one here... I've got to mount a network cab up in my loft. I'm not a fan of the mounting mechanism to be honest as it looks really flimsy but i'll give it the benefit of the doubt as it's how they sell them.

    I have to mount the cab to what looks like breese block and i'm concerned that my fixings wont bond well and may pull out. What fixings would you use to mount this cab suspended on the wall? Lastly is the mortar/ pointing an issue at all as it looks like movement over the time (house 1956) the cab is unlikely to weight more than 30kg loaded. pics below:

    I currently have these fischer fixings that are 8mm x 80mm any good?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. thestraycat

    thestraycat Member

    Anyone? Maybe this is tougher than i expected!! :)
     
  3. Starslikedust

    Starslikedust Member

    You could leave it freestanding?
     
  4. thestraycat

    thestraycat Member

    @Starslike - Yeah, it's a good point i had considered it... But it is handy to suspend it to get easier access to running the cables into the bottom of it as it keeps it more accessible to add, remove and initally wire the 24 x 9mm cables that come up from the loft floor boards and into the cab. Just dont know whether the fixings ive got are ideal tbh. But it's a mind field. Ultimately i'm just looking for someone to advise a good connector that theyve used to hang heavy weight from breeseblock/cinderblocks
     
  5. FlyByNight

    FlyByNight Well-Known Member

    What about putting a very large sheet of ply on teh wall using a large number of fixings plus a layer of grab adhesive?

    Then use coach screws to attach the cabinet.
     
    candoabitofmoststuff likes this.
  6. JasonCSmith

    JasonCSmith Member

    Is a loft a suitable environment for a data cabinet? Lofts get stinking hot in the summer months.
     
  7. thestraycat

    thestraycat Member

    @JasonCSmith - Your right, It'll have ventilation when i'm finished.
    @FlyNyNight - Yeah possibly. As the cab has its own mount, which is a little dubious granted i was hoping to just use fixings for the mounting plate to the breese block but just dont know what the best type of fixings are. googling brings up a load of unusual screws, anchorded fixings and fischer connectors...
     
  8. FlyByNight

    FlyByNight Well-Known Member

    One problem you have is the amount of cracks and bond failures in that wall. It will support the vertical load of the roof and it self, but what will happen if you hang a heavy weight on it?

    A sheet of 18/22mm ply or OSB with plenty of 80mm expanding fixings would lock it all together and you then fix the cabinet where you want. Cut to shape and fitted, you will then also have an easy fix for trunking, cable clips or other devices.
     
  9. Roys

    Roys Active Member

    I’m with FlyByNight on this one with one minor difference, I would use resin studs M6 or M8, instead of expanding fixings which are going to stress already slightly dubious masonary. Resin won’t put it under the same stress and is still a very strong fixing.
    Also slightly concerned as mentioned above above loft temps and electronics, although I run DVRs and inverters up a loft with no probs.
     
  10. FlyByNight

    FlyByNight Well-Known Member

    Only issue with resin is you have studs with nuts protruding so difficult to then flat mount on it. Some decent Fischer 8 or 10 mm plugs (Duopower) in the centre of each block should not put too much force out to the edges.


    On temeprature - ONT, Gateway, Switch(es), video recorder, intruder alarm are located in one of my lofts. It has 160mm of Celotex insulation though, but can get warm. There is a small 12v fan which pushes warm air out of a 50mm diameter duct and everything survives.
     
  11. thestraycat

    thestraycat Member

    @FlyByNight @Roys

    Thanks guys. Some great info in the thread, nice to see you guys also have done similar things. Some take away points for me.


    1. Use a ply mounting board - I'd dabbled with the idea of this but moved away from it as i was concerned it might hide any water ingress, condensation issues etc around my electronics and didnt think i'd need it as planned on everything being cab mounted. But to be honest, it makes sense to have more mounting positions for conduit and sharing the load out across my dubious wall. And having a better material to mount too.

    - Does anyone know of any stand-offs that i could use to create say a 10mm gap between the board and the breese blocks to better help with air circulation behind the board and to stop any moisture from this external facing wall travelling into the board? I take it this would also increase the load to the fixings quite a bit too though? Maybe just some thin wooden battons?
    - Would these suffic to mount the board to the concrete? (https://www.tapcon.com/products/heavy-duty-tapcon-plus) looks like an American product, if anyone can link me to something that would do the job, that would really help...
    - Any need to seal the breese blocks prior to mounting the board?

    @FlyByNight - Can you elaborate on "There is a small 12v fan which pushes warm air out of a 50mm diameter duct and everything survives." I'd love to hear more about it?

    - What type of 12v fan (PC, bathroom extraction 12v fan or AV cab cooling 12v fan?)
    - Does it run constantly?
    - I take it your not using any conduit to shroud the air from your equipment to outside and instead have opted to mount the fan in a wall to remove ambient air?

    Any more info or a picture if you have one on your phone would be awesome.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2021
  12. thestraycat

    thestraycat Member

  13. Roys

    Roys Active Member

    On stand offs, if it is only a small gap, my go to stand off spacer are tap washers, you can buy a pack of 50 for buttons, I often double them up as each one is about 5mm thick, then also if one of the bricks happens to be set slightly back I can easily add 3 or 4 washers to make the board stand off evenly.
    Big gaps I use things like conduit couplers but that is not appropriate here.
     
  14. Roys

    Roys Active Member

    I have just gone out to an old stone shed that has uneven stonework and taken a pic of where I used tap washers to stand off and even up a board.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Hans_25

    Hans_25 Screwfix Select

    1" battens screwed to the wall, plywood screwed to battens, cab screwed to plywood?
     
  16. thestraycat

    thestraycat Member

    @Roys - Thanks for confirming. Yeah that could work. What do you make of the links to the screws above?
    @Hans_25 - Yup i'm leaning in this direction i think, if i can find a good screw/connector that is! Spoke to a fixening specialist and he was quite uncomittal. Said the tapcons are good but as i stated an american product. mentioned that anchor fixings get you most of the way there as a uk alternative if price is a barrier. What would you use for a fixing?
     
  17. FlyByNight

    FlyByNight Well-Known Member

    All I did was core drill through te wall and put a length of waste pipe though, with some expanded mesh to stop birds and mice. The fan was a small 60mm PC/electronics 12v fan, an adapter from a plastic milk bottle to fix together. Powered permanently from my intruder alarm power supply and was just pushing ambient air out.

    It has now been removed - my old switch and other equipment was fried by 400kV in a lightning strike. The replacements are fanless low power Ubiquiti and te ambient air does not get too warm now.

    As Hans suggests - 25mm batten to act as stand offs.
     
  18. Hans_25

    Hans_25 Screwfix Select

    I'd probably just use long screws and brown rawlplugs
     

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