What kind of solid wood to use for kitchen worktop?

Discussion in 'Kitchen Fitters' Talk' started by MoonFlower, May 8, 2020.

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What wood shall I use for my kitchen worktop?

  1. Oak

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Beech

    2 vote(s)
    100.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. MoonFlower

    MoonFlower New Member

    Hi, one of my kitchen worktop is in very poor condition and I’m considering replacing it with small budget. I need to find a replacement that would match the look of other 2 worktops. Could someone tell me what kind of wood my current worktop is from the photos attached to this post, if at all possible? It seem to be stained and in some parts it’s darker than others. I thought it’s either oak or beech but I’m not sure. I’ll be buying the worktop online so need to be sure I’m getting the right thing.

    From online photos I’ve seen so far beech looks very similar to oak but lighter and cheaper so maybe I should just get beech and stain it to match the colour of the rest of the kitchen?

    Please help me with some advice. Thank you!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Screwfix Select

    I'm sorry, but the images are so small i can't tell what timber it is at all.
     
  3. MoonFlower

    MoonFlower New Member

  4. MoonFlower

    MoonFlower New Member

    Hi, thank you very much for looking! I've attached bigger images now, hope they'll be more helpful. For some reason I cannot replace the ones in the original post so had to post new set in my reply. Thank you!
     
  5. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Screwfix Select

    I'm 99% certain they are oak. They are all in a very poor condition though.
     
  6. Paulie1412

    Paulie1412 Active Member

    I would have said beech looking at the flecks in the first picture and the colouring from the second although I agree with above about the condition of the existing tops being very poor although in photo 4 they look like oak
     
  7. MoonFlower

    MoonFlower New Member

    Thank you so much! Yes, they are really worn out and I’m planning to replace the one near the sink as it became real eyesore.

    Do you think it would work if I got lighter beech worktop, sanded down the 2 Oak work tops that I plan to keep and then used coloured oil to match the colour of the new one and the existing worktops? Or would it look odd? I’m not after perfection, the kitchen is quite old and I’m just trying to give it few more years of life before it’s replaced completely so trying to keep the cost of the worktop as low as I can.
     
  8. Isaac Cox

    Isaac Cox Member

    Much as I hate to disagree with kitfit1 (I've read loads of his posts and he really knows his stuff) I actually think it's beech. The short grain flecks are the giveaway I think.
     
    kitfit1 likes this.
  9. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Screwfix Select

    Unfortunately a lot of oak worktops also have a lot of short grain flecks in as well. I had a real problem making my mind up because of the end grain and the front edges of the tops, but in the end it was these two things that swung it for me.
    Because of the poor condition though, they could well be beech..................it is a tricky one though.
     
    Paulie1412 likes this.
  10. rogerk101

    rogerk101 Screwfix Select

    Whatever it is it could very easily be restored with a bit of sanding and then re-oiling. I've restored far worse than that. If the stains are really deep, you could try using a wood bleach to get rid of them, especially if they're stains from metal.
    A restoration project will likely be a better match than a replacement.
     
  11. MoonFlower

    MoonFlower New Member

    I considered restoring but in some parts the damage is too bad (see photo attached). Not sure it’ll be possible to do any sort of restoration with this level of damage?
     

    Attached Files:

  12. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Screwfix Select

    No, that is completely gone and well past the point of no return.
     
  13. rogerk101

    rogerk101 Screwfix Select

    Agree - that's pretty shot!
     

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