where to start?

Discussion in 'Tilers' Talk' started by mrs erus, Oct 10, 2018.

  1. mrs erus

    mrs erus Member

    Hi All

    Im about to embark on tiling the extension floor. In an ideal world, Id be paying someone who knows exactly what they're doing, however, because of massive unexpected extra costs, we no longer have the budget so are doing as much as we can, so please no mean comments about get someone who knows what they're doing like Ive had on another forum, as Id seriously love to do that as Im actually dreading this.

    Ive tiled floors, bathrooms, kitchens etc with porcelain tiles before but never on this scale, with this many aspects or with this size of tile, 600mm x 600mm porcelain tiles, my dilemma is that when Ive tiled before, Ive drawn a cross in the centre, regardless of wall or floor and tiled each quadrant from the centre outwards, but this floor means I have to consider 3 doorways, each has a different width and depth but each as important and equally noticeable if the layout isn't right? Ive included a floorpan basic drawing to make it easier to see what I have to do.
    Basically, How best should I begin to lay the tiles? Should I do the whole cross in the middle of the room thing again, or do I focus on one door being right and hope the others look ok?
    Thanks in advance.

    Screen Shot 2018-10-10 at 22.04.51.png
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2018
  2. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member

    Very difficult to advise without actually being there, but if I was you I would spend a good few hours setting the tiles out dry and seeing what point to start from would be best. It also depends on which door into the kitchen is most frequently used as an entrance, as a full tile centre of the doorway looks good, provided another prominent area doesn't look ridiculous as a result. From the diagram, starting centre at the bottom doorway and working up to the opposite wall looks to be first choice if it works out ok. Check where the tiles finish in regards to the base unit plinths too, as a sliver will look annoying for a lifetime. A lot of professional tilers bumcheeks would twitch at this particular job, large format porcelain on a kitchen floor, so I wish you the best of luck.

    A wildcard, but have you considered laying them in herringbone fashion I.e. diagonal? Though you will have a lot more cuts and a fair bit more waste.
     
  3. mrs erus

    mrs erus Member

    Thanks Jord86, I have thought about turning them diagonal but that fills me with even more dread to add yet another angle into the equation. Im thinking that brick style might work well to lose the whole emphasis on lines being in the wrong place? I'll try as you say and dry lay them and see how I go... Sometimes I really wish I wasn't the DIY person in this household :-/
     
  4. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member

    I personally think brick bond with square tiles looks odd, but everyone's different and it's your house. Good luck.
     
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  5. mrs erus

    mrs erus Member

    lol... Ive never tried it, but worth looking at to make life easier...
     
  6. Richard_

    Richard_ Active Member

    If you're skilled enough to do that visualisation then create a new layer with the tile grid (with grout spacing) and slide it around on screen until you get one or two preferred layouts that you can try out with dry tiles.

    You could post options on here for comments.

    Personally I'd try to try symmetry at the main doors, either centred tile or centred joint. That fixes the left/right setting out on your drawing. The dominant feature for up/down seems to be the stairs so get tiles centred on that. Then see how the grid plays out for the rest of the room.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2018
  7. rogerk101

    rogerk101 Well-Known Member

    It's important to know how square or out of square your room is.
    If it's out of square, tiling roughly in line with the walls will exaggerate how out of square the room is. However, tiling diagonally will render the out-of-squareness almost unnoticeable.
    It's always well worth the upfront investment of time doing a dry layout, and doing so very accurately rather than just roughly.
    Tiling is a true indicator of a hacker versus someone that knows what he/she is doing. If it's down well, it's unnoticeable. If it's done badly, it is seriously noticeable.
     
  8. mrs erus

    mrs erus Member

    Thanks Rogerk101, Im hoping that as a new built extension, which wasn't cheap and the builder made a huge deal out of paying extra to a ground worker to come and do the extension up to DPC level with lasers, because he said thats the only proper way to work, that its at least within a few mm .... otherwise I'll be asking for the extra ££££s back...!
     
  9. rogerk101

    rogerk101 Well-Known Member

    In that case, I would do as follows ...
    Measure the half way mark on each end of the length of the room and snap a line between the two points.
    Measure the half way mark on each end of the width of the room and snap a line between the two points.
    You now have two long lines bisecting the two main axes. Ideally they will be perpendicular to each other. If not, withhold a big percentage of your payment to your builder.
    Measure the length of the room. Divide it by 600mm plus one grout line thickness (eg. 3mm). If the result is close to a round number then start tiling on either side of the mid-line of the room. If the result is not close to a round number, then the middle tile should straddle the mid-line of the room.
    Now do the same with the width of the room.
    Tile from the centre outwards.
     
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  10. Richard_

    Richard_ Active Member

    Lasers guarantee straight lines, but the straight lines might not be in the right place ;)

    I was once seeing up a laser straight line, got distracted, got back to work and wondered why it didn't look right halfway along the run. Then I realised I was about to check the laser against datum and offset when I was distracted. The work was prefectly straight and level, just in the wrong place!
     
  11. Richard_

    Richard_ Active Member

  12. mrs erus

    mrs erus Member

    ahhh I wondered what they were called when I watched a youtube video of tiling... may have to get me some of these as thats a big concern with tiling is that one tile corer will be sticking up and its sods law that it'll always be one that you catch your toe on!
     
  13. mrs erus

    mrs erus Member

    Thanks Roger, ill give it a go...
     

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