Why chipboard ?

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by lensman, Jul 3, 2007.

  1. lensman

    lensman New Member

    Hi guys,

    I'm replacing an old upstairs chipboard floor - previous occupant had nailed it down and it didn't survive being taken up for re-wiring and plumbing. The chipboard was laid on 6x2 joists, 3m span, roughly 40cm separation. It will be carpetted once it's replaced, but room contains a sink, so some possibility of water spills.

    What I'm wondering about is why people generally use chipboard rather than plywood to lay such a floor?

    Is plywood actually a better material but chipboard is just cheaper?
     
  2. Is plywood actually a better material but chipboard
    is just cheaper?

    Dead right.

    Why don'y you use moisture resistance chip, its green coloured for ID purposes, costs alittle more but worth it
     
  3. > What I'm wondering about is why people generally use
    chipboard rather than plywood to lay such a floor?



    ..some people don't have any choice coz the original builders use this stuff
     
  4. !!

    !! New Member

    You can get plastic coated chipboard flooring, can't think of the name right now but I think Travis Perkins stock it. It is good quality stuff, fully waterproof if you use Poly U glue
     
  5. ponty01.

    ponty01. New Member

    You can always go traditional and use T&G floorboards, and then forget about any future damage through moisture. Chipborad was not only cheaper than this method but it also quicker to lay - but the trade of is the unsuitability of it if it gets damp - once damp it will weaken the chipborad. Plus when chipborad floors get damp the builders will not be responsible for the cause - it will generally be an error by the householder or the original plumber, so you cannot claim against the builder - it was dry when he left the job!
     
  6. joiner_sim

    joiner_sim New Member

    Use T&G floorboards or if price is an issue, moisture resistant chipboard.
     
  7. ponty01.

    ponty01. New Member

    JS is correct but remember, moisture resistant does not mean waterproof.
     
  8. ebanista

    ebanista New Member

    Chipboard? 'cos it was cheap as chips and usually laid over the entire floor THEN the walls put up, (stud or hollow board). Can do an average size floor in about an hour, including tea break.

    In my experience "moisture resistant" chip isn't worth the ink it's printed with. It will still damage too easily.

    T&G floor boards are the way to go. More convenient than large sheets of chip, easier to work with, easier to repair and will allow you to place inspection points more easily. Plus, you can even leave 'em exposed if that's your bag! saves on floor covering too.
     
  9. lensman

    lensman New Member

    Thanks for the comments guys.

    I was looking at plywood rather than T&G as I'm assuming it's easier to lay and would be easier to redo for future access (the main house plumbing and wiring all run through this floor).

    What's the downside of using plywood? (Forget the cost, I'm planning to retire into the place so willing to spend a few quid extra now for something that's more likely to last and will be easier to maintain)
     

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