Zipbolt half mitre on both ends??

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Charles Norbury, Aug 21, 2020.

  1. Charles Norbury

    Charles Norbury New Member

    Hi All,
    I'm going to use the zipbolt half mitre connectors to attach a handrail to the newels top and bottom, but you'd never get both ends in. Am I missing something, or is there a trick to it? Appreciate the benefit of your experience!
    Cheers
     
  2. SoManyUserNames

    SoManyUserNames Active Member

    You are quite right, you will not get a zip bolt at both ends, you could use the zip bolt at the top; this would help lock it into place, I would back this up with a couple of dowels to stop it sliding. At the bottom, I would use a screw through the bottom and then pellet over the screw head, as you do the screw up it will pull the handrail up and should lock it in nice and tight.
    I can do a quick visual if that would help.
     
  3. Charles Norbury

    Charles Norbury New Member

    Yeah thanks, that makes sense. Going to be a fairly short screw to get in there between the spindle and newel, but doesn't need much I guess, it'll be glued too. I don't think I'll get dowels in at the top, there's nowhere for the handrail to go for space. Or have I misunderstood?? I find it quite amusing that I can get a specialized connector in one end, and the other will basically be a lash up! Thanks for your help!
     
  4. SoManyUserNames

    SoManyUserNames Active Member

    Maybe misunderstood or maybe I did not explain it properly. I guess the handrail is of a passable length and not between to close by newels if spindles are to be fitted.
    This is the way I have always fitted the handrail when not built-in with the stairs, so a mortice and tenon is not an option for both ends.
    The top could still be morticed in and the bottom is best screwed in, once fitted the handrail can not be pushed down as the spindles will prevent this happening.
    The handrail should be screwed into place before any spindles are fitted, so there should be plenty of room for a 3 or 4" screw, this will be needed as you do not want the screw hole to close to the end of the handrail as it will tear out when tightening.
    I will do a quick visual to confirm what I am suggesting, hopefully have it done this evening but may be Friday afternoon.
     
  5. SoManyUserNames

    SoManyUserNames Active Member

    Do you have a picture of the two newels and the space between them or even a horizontal dimension between the post and the size of the handrail profile that you are going to use? then I will draw them up for you.
     
  6. Charles Norbury

    Charles Norbury New Member

    Thanks for the replies! I think I get it now, of course the spindles wouldn't be in place when the handrail is fitted! Plenty of space to get a screw in the bottom. It's the handrail up the stairs between top and bottom newels. No need to draw, I understand, thanks for your help!
     
  7. JOMEL

    JOMEL Active Member

    Felling old and dumb now
    Whats a ZIPBOLT

    Johnny M
     
  8. SoManyUserNames

    SoManyUserNames Active Member

    A zipbolt is like a dowel bolt with an offset nut that is turned via a hex head bevel gear. One end is screwed into one of the component parts, the other end has a housing that encases the nut, the nut is tightened by a perpendicularly driven Allan key socket that is connected to the nut via a bevel gear.
    Sorry, that is the easiest way I can explain it, these are being used a lot lately for fixing handrails together.
     
  9. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    Horrendous things, they always work loose, the only thing they're good for is in the event of getting large furniture up the stairs they can be disassembled fairly easily.
     
    SoManyUserNames likes this.
  10. JOMEL

    JOMEL Active Member

    OOPS
    I am still older 87 but feel dumber now I cant work that out at all.
    I feel a Google comming on.
    Pic please.

    Johnny M
     
  11. SoManyUserNames

    SoManyUserNames Active Member

    Totally agree, the original handrail bolts undo for re-glueing and then re-tighten without a care in the world, would hate to have to repair joints in a hundred years or so with these bolts fitted, they often need replacing first time round and you have to dismantle the handrail to do so.

    I have had more luck with Llemelo fixings, you have to be spot on with alignment and need a special tool do tighten them but totally hidden, ideal for exhibition work and smaller handrail sections.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2020
  12. SoManyUserNames

    SoManyUserNames Active Member

    Here is a video showing the basics operation.
     

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