Anyone got any puttying tips?

Discussion in 'Painters' Talk' started by Goldenduck, Aug 17, 2007.

  1. Goldenduck

    Goldenduck New Member

    Struggling a bit with puttying windows. I bought a clipt putty knife but I don't even know which way round to use it...(!)

    Whenever I do the long slide down or across the putty breaks up. Would that mean the putty is too dry? It's nice and sticky when I roll it in my hands.

    I appreciate it's probably one of those things that's impossible to teach by reading about it but if anyone's any tips I'd be really happy. Thanks.
  2. Astramax

    Astramax Active Member

    Throw away the putty knife and use 15mm copper about 150mm long with 35mm length flattened at one end and with a bent angle of about 25 degrees. Then practice.
  3. Welsh Decorator 42

    Welsh Decorator 42 New Member

    The problem is that you do not have any form of lubrication.

    Yes, it does take a little practice, but with a lube, it becomes far easyr, try a small pot with water and a tiny spot of washing up liquid in it, then dip the knife in this on a regular basis, you will find the putty will not pull under the knife.

    Failing water mix, use a spray glass cleaner.
  4. gardm1nt

    gardm1nt New Member

    The secret is a firm quick movement just like cutting glass.

    Press a string of puty into the rebate, ste in your packers then press in the glasss with firm pressure and tap in sprigs or pins.

    Start at one corner with the curve of the knife facing the outside and pull the knife whilst turning it so the angle the blade faces the glass. Keep a firm pressure up as you pull it and turn the knife again so as to form a sharp corner angle. Repeat for other sides then run the knife over the inside of the frame to remove the putty trails squezed up.

    The putty should be pliable but not so soft it sticks to your hands
  5. chippie244

    chippie244 Active Member

    After years of having problems using a putty knife I saw a glazier use a thin filling blade, bought one, and life is so much easier. :)
  6. ponty01.

    ponty01. New Member

    Obviously some people on this forum have very little experience :)
  7. jcts

    jcts Active Member

    stick with the putty knife, i think their a lovely bit of kit. roll up the putty and then roll it in powder filler. then use it as gardm1nt describes. also once it's in, give it 2 coats of knotting solution so it can be painted after
  8. jimbobfingernails

    jimbobfingernails New Member

    Make sure you knead the putty for a couple of minutes to warm it up and make it pliable. If it sticks to your fingers then it's too wet, if this is the case then make the putty into a ball and roll it round on some newspaper to soak up the excess linseed oil. As said before a wetted putty knife will stop the knife from dragging. And again practice makes perfect.
  9. Burlington Bertie

    Burlington Bertie New Member

    The problem is that you do not have any form of
    lubrication.

    Yes, it does take a little practice, but with a lube,
    it becomes far easyr, try a small pot with water and
    a tiny spot of washing up liquid in it, then dip the
    knife in this on a regular basis, you will find the
    putty will not pull under the knife.

    Failing water mix, use a spray glass cleaner.

    Or just spit on the knife every now and then - works a treat
  10. Goldenduck

    Goldenduck New Member

    The secret is a firm quick movement just like cutting
    glass.

    Press a string of puty into the rebate, ste in your
    packers then press in the glasss with firm pressure
    and tap in sprigs or pins.

    Start at one corner with the curve of the knife
    facing the outside and pull the knife whilst turning
    it so the angle the blade faces the glass. Keep a
    firm pressure up as you pull it and turn the knife
    again so as to form a sharp corner angle. Repeat for
    other sides then run the knife over the inside of the
    frame to remove the putty trails squezed up.

    The putty should be pliable but not so soft it sticks
    to your hands


    Firstly, thanks a lot for everyone's help.

    I'm still having trouble picturing which way to hold the knife. Lets say I'm putting the right hand side of the window. I've put the putty against the glass with my hands. Now I press it in top to bottom with the knife. Next I'm ready for the 'long slide' down. You couldn't explain it again, could you? Thanks.
  11. gardm1nt

    gardm1nt New Member

    This is one of those thing that in reality is very simple but hard to explain. Picturing your knife, there is a point at the tip of the blade, a curved edge and a straight angled blade.


    Start off in the left corner of the rebate with the curved edge facing the exterior of the frame. Press the blade down and cut into the corner at the same time turn it so the angled blade side faces the glass, pull the blade along with firm pressure, turning the knife at the end to form the corner.

    Try the above on an existing putty line and all should hopefully be explained.

    The end result is what matters, in truth so long as the putty is the right consistency and you keep pressure on the blade you should get a good result. I have seen people use chisel knifes before and even just using the point of the blade.
  12. Georgieboy

    Georgieboy New Member

    Rather think that the knife mentioned above is a 'stopping knife' not a putty knife.
    A putty knife is cut straight across at the top and is about 1" wide.

    I remember watching a glazier facing some panes many years ago and he told me the secret is to keep the blade scrupulously clean at all times.
  13. chippie244

    chippie244 Active Member

  14. Georgieboy

    Georgieboy New Member

    Ok. I have gone back to a very, very old text book of mine that says the top one is a stopping knife, putty or glazing knife, so all bases are covered it seems.

    Myself, if I am facing up, I find a 1" filling knife ideal.
  15. chippie244

    chippie244 Active Member

  16. Goldenduck

    Goldenduck New Member

    Just wanted to say thanks to everyone who helped. It was a big help and I got a decent finish in the end. Not easy though!
  17. Ion Transient

    Ion Transient New Member

    > Ok. I have gone back to a very, very old text book of
    mine that says the top one is a stopping knife, putty
    or glazing knife, so all bases are covered it seems.

    Myself, if I am facing up, I find a 1" filling knife
    ideal.




    WTF????
  18. tonynoarm

    tonynoarm New Member

    Puttying is just such a horrible job. I can do it but not cost effectively - its takes me an age when I do such a job (I only do it on my own property)
  19. feva

    feva New Member

    im on a job at the moment, its a 1900's farmhouse, with 33 sash windows, all to burn the paint off, replace any putty, which the front side, which is exposed all year to the weather, has about 75% of the putty falling out, yesterday i was burning the paint of and a massive chunk of window fell out. to top this the tub of putty im useing the top half has to much oil in it, it sticks to every thing, tryed all sorts to get it dryed out, i was uing a putty knife and a tub of soapy water but there was to much putty to replace to use it, it was just slowing my down, ive been using my finger to get smoothed out, looks better than the putty knife, il try to but some photobucket to night.
  20. feva

    feva New Member

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