Plaster or not

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by gordy1, Jan 4, 2014.

  1. gordy1

    gordy1 Member

    Hi, i have just created a small bedroom in my loft conversion & wondered if i could finish the plaster board off by filling in the screw heads & taping the joints with the ultra thin fabric tape as sold at S.F, then painting over to save having to plaster, i have done this with smaller jobs ie cupboards & a feature chimney breast & they look as good as the plastered walls, any one got any thoughts on the idea please?
  2. Sean_ork

    Sean_ork Screwfix Select

  3. gordy1

    gordy1 Member

    Thanks Sean, Have found a site on you tube which is quite useful,the thing is i have already boarded it out but i used square edge plaster board , do you think it will still work ok? as it said to use tappered edge board.
  4. Sean_ork

    Sean_ork Screwfix Select

    no problem there - you just need a wide taper on the filling - do a search for the Gtec Siniat drywall manual as it give a reasonably detailed process within
  5. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    You could probably manage to rough the joint up with a rasp file and flexible filler it(paintable filler of course). Perhaps slide a wet trowel down it for a perfect finish.

    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
  6. Devil's Advocate

    Devil's Advocate Well-Known Member

    Hi Gordy.

    If you have a light source from, say, a window that falls at an acute angle along the wall, don't be surprised if it'll show up the filler 'taper' over the raised scrim. Fair chance that won't be the case as it's in a loft conversion, though, so you might be ok?

    Ok, I'm gonna be shot down for suggesting such a cowboy thing as this, but I'll chuck it in here as it's something I've done myself many moons ago and got away with it... I did the same as you - bought square-edged p'board for a room I was updating, as I hadn't even realised there was such a thing as taper-edged at the time :oops:. And as I'd never done any skimming before, I wasn't prepared to learn for the sake of one wall.

    So, my solution was to PVA the p'board edges together as I fitted them, butting the papered edges together tightly. I then ran another smear of PVA down each join to be sure to be sure, and wiped off the excess. That effectively glued the sheets together. All that was then needed was a very thin skim of filler to fill the wee groove and join in the paper edge. Light sanding, completely flat finish, painted, and when I left that place years later, no cracks had appeared.

    YEEEEEEEE-HHAAAAAAAAAA!
    Skimvader likes this.
  7. gordy1

    gordy1 Member

    Thanks D.A, jist gonna put up a railing for me hoss and ill git planning,yee haaaa!
    mad4kitchens likes this.
  8. Devil's Advocate

    Devil's Advocate Well-Known Member

  9. JP.

    JP. Screwfix Select

    Blow all the faffing about - just ''whip on a skim'' OP.
  10. Devil's Advocate

    Devil's Advocate Well-Known Member

    ... after PVA-ing the join...
  11. JP.

    JP. Screwfix Select

    I suppose re-iteration is indicated DA, and thanks for pointing out said - although I think the geezer is already aware of the fact that the joints must be scrimmed.

    Scrim up and ''whip on a skim'' - dunno about PVA'ing the scrimmed joints before skimming - i've never done it, and can see no plaster degradation after what some 10 years.
  12. Devil's Advocate

    Devil's Advocate Well-Known Member

    JP, I'm not saying it's the right way to do it, or even an alternative way. In fact, it has 'cowboy' written all over it :).

    But, all I am saying is that I tried it once for the same reasons as Gordy, and it worked.

    The OP is trying to avoid a complete skim - I guess because he hasn't done it before, or wants to save money. So, if he instead goes the 'scrim and feather-fill' route, I think he'll find it a 'mare as he'll very likely expose the scrim when sanding it all down (because you really want the filler over the scrim to be as thin as possible). Or he'll damage the plasterboard surface paper around the filler when sanding. And he'll likely have to add more filler in places.

    And then he'll still notice the raised bit over the scrim when it's all painted.

    I'm not saying that my Mickey Mouse method is the solution, only that it did work for me.

Share This Page