tomatoes

Discussion in 'Just Talk' started by tom.plum, Jul 20, 2013.

  1. tom.plum

    tom.plum Screwfix Select

    they've failed again this year, whats up with these?

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  2. teabreak

    teabreak Active Member

    Looks like Tomato blight to me, no cure I'm afraid.  I find my outdoor ones always get it but so far greenhouse ones are ok.
  3. ramseyman

    ramseyman Member

    Could be tomato blight but if so the leaves would be affected. Caused by too high humidity and temperature.. Looks more like Blossom end rot causeed by a shortage of lime.  Google it Tom and you should see identical pictures
  4. MrGrimNasty

    MrGrimNasty New Member

  5. Astramax

    Astramax Active Member

    Does look like blight, bit early though usually mid to late August. Plants can be sprayed with a product called Bordeaux mix to help prevent blight. I grow blight resistant tomato's as for years had the same problem, this year I grew a tomato called Lizzano and have been picking tom's for the last week.
  6. Astramax

    Astramax Active Member

    Just had another look at the photo, Mr Grims right, blossom end rot caused by infrequent watering creating a lack of calcium to the plant.
  7. tom.plum

    tom.plum Screwfix Select

    thanks people, I agree with grimbo, I had blight last year, this is differant,  I'll take a look at those Lizzano one for next year astro, I'm a brand new gardener and learning as I go, so thank you all for your help

    :)
  8. tom.plum

    tom.plum Screwfix Select

    I don't think its my watering though, I water them twice a day in this weather, but maybe the soil is bad quality, I'll import some better soil next year,
  9. MrGrimNasty

    MrGrimNasty New Member

    If you remove the affected fruit the problem might well resolve on its own as the plants mature. Don't water so much that the roots rot. You could try cutting back a bit if they can make it through the day without a top-up.
  10. tom.plum

    tom.plum Screwfix Select

    cheers grimbo, i've removed the infected friut,  how can i tell if ' they make it through the day without a top up?" is there a way of telling they have enough water
  11. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    It is blossom end rot Tomp, usually caused by inconsistent watering as the fruit sets, and a lack of clacium in the soil. When they were flowering, did you perchance, forget to water them one time?  When the fruit is setting on the plant, they need plenty of water. Now that there's fruit on them, are you feeding them every few days with Tomato plant food? Choose one that contains trace amounts of calcium, or put a small dressing of bonemeal round the base of the plant and water it into the soil.  . You can pull the affected toms opff the plant as it doesn't spread to non affected fruit. ;)

    PS Tomp, what are you growing them in? Hopefully not just the soil in yer greenhouse. If so, before plantng them next year, dig plenty of manure into the soil and some peat based potting compound. The manure will add nutrients to the soil and the potting compund will aid water retentiuon in the soil. ;)
  12. tom.plum

    tom.plum Screwfix Select

    john, I;m growing them in big tubs, there's 2 plants in two tubs and one in another, in the tubs I've filled with a compost that said recommended for tomato's, dunno if its anything to do with it but in the tub where the blossum end rot has broke out there are toadstools growing, i've not planted them, they just appeared,
    I've watered the tomatoes twice every day, morning and evening, the tubs have holes in so the water drains, and i use a tomatoe feed twice a week, I tried cucumbers as well this year but the slugs killed them, I put epsom salts in the compost to deter the slugs but it did't work, the slugs dont seem to bother the tomato plant though,
  13. jason527

    jason527 New Member

    They looks bad, because those tomatos happen something wrong with their care, I always have tomatos in my garden and never got like them. Which seeds you used and what is your method?
  14. MrGrimNasty

    MrGrimNasty New Member

    Very common. Even professionals get it. Gardeners' World....

    "In Monty?s trial, the tomato plants in the grow bag are romping away but their fruit is the first to show signs of blossom end rot.

    Blossom end rot is a physiological condition caused by an irregular water supply. When water is not constantly available to plant roots, calcium (a key nutrient in the soil or compost) can?t circulate fully around the plant and this leads to cell damage in the fruits.

    Grow bags are notoriously difficult to keep consistently moist as they provide a very limited root space and can be tricky to fill with water. If you use grow bags, take extra care to ensure water is properly absorbed before draining out of the bags and the compost never fully dries out.

    If you see blossom end rot on your tomatoes, don?t worry: affected fruits are inedible but new healthy fruits should form once watering is adjusted.
  15. tom.plum

    tom.plum Screwfix Select

    you're correct, the rest of my crop are doing well, I've not adjusted my watering times or ammounts but I've noticed since the reaaly hot days have past, the pots are staying moist, whereas before they were drying out, I think that might have caused it, anyrode I'm looking foeward to home grown tomatoes real soon,:)
  16. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    I've got a couple of tomatoes now, just starting to turn red. Should be picking them in a few days Tomp. ;)
  17. tom.plum

    tom.plum Screwfix Select

    mine too are just forming a colour change, won't be long, does stopping them make them better, mine are about 6 ft tall now and they seem to be lots more little ones at the top,hopefully these will all make it to the table,Its a learning curve for me John, this year I learned that the single plant in its own tub is doing better that the other four plants which are planted 2 in a tub, took all the lower shoots off too as I leaned on utube that, thats how blight gets in, it jumps up from the soil/compost onto the leaves and infests the plant, so far so good :)
  18. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    Because mine are outdoors (not in a greenhouse) the growing conditions are a bit harsher, Tomp, so they dunna grow as fast as in a greenhouse. By stopping them at 4 trusses, it ensures that any tomatoes have a chance to ripen on the plant before the end of the growing season, or the first frosts of autumn. ;)
  19. tom.plum

    tom.plum Screwfix Select

    picked and ate the first red one just now, have to say I'm a bit dissapointed in ther taste, perhaps its the type ( money makers) or they've not had enough tomatorite feed, but they just don't seem as sweet as last years, maybe i'm expecting too much, ah well maybe they'll get better as they grow on, there's loads on the plants,
  20. ramseyman

    ramseyman Member

    Moneymakers are renowned for poor flavour although they crop well which is why they're grown commercially.  In my opinion best for flavour are Shirley, Gardeners Delight, Sweet 100 or a new one I tried this yr called Dolcevita, small but strong flavour  Paradoxically the more you feed the poorer the tase, same goes for watering, underwatering also improves flavour.  None of these are prone to blossom end rot either Tom.  You could also do a Prince Charles and rather than talk sing to them. 

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